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Root growth compensates for molar wear in adult goats (Capra aegagrus hircus)


Ackermans, Nicole L; Clauss, Marcus; Winkler, Daniela E; Schulz-Kornas, Ellen; Kaiser, Thomas M; Müller, Dennis W H; Kircher, Patrick R; Hummel, Jürgen; Hatt, Jean-Michel (2019). Root growth compensates for molar wear in adult goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology, 331(2):139-148.

Abstract

One reason for the mammalian clade’s success is the evolutionary diversity of their teeth. In herbivores, this is represented by high‐crowned teeth evolved to compensate for wear caused by dietary abrasives like phytoliths and grit. Exactly how dietary abrasives wear teeth is still not understood completely. We fed four different pelleted diets of increasing abrasiveness (L: Lucerne; G: grass; GR: grass and rice husks; GRS: grass, rice husks, and sand) to four groups of a total of 28 adult goats, all with completely erupted third molars, over a six‐month period. Tooth morphology was captured by medical computed tomography scans at the beginning and end of the controlled feeding experiment, and separation lines between the crown and root segments were defined in the upper right second molar (M2), to gauge absolute wear. Using bootstrapping, significant differences in volume loss between diets L/G and GR/GRS were detected. A small but nevertheless consistent volume gain was noted in the roots, and there was a significant, positive correlation between crown volume loss and root volume gain. This growth could possibly be attributed to the well‐known process of cementum deposition and its relation with a putative feedback mechanism, in place to attenuate wear caused by abrasive diets.

Abstract

One reason for the mammalian clade’s success is the evolutionary diversity of their teeth. In herbivores, this is represented by high‐crowned teeth evolved to compensate for wear caused by dietary abrasives like phytoliths and grit. Exactly how dietary abrasives wear teeth is still not understood completely. We fed four different pelleted diets of increasing abrasiveness (L: Lucerne; G: grass; GR: grass and rice husks; GRS: grass, rice husks, and sand) to four groups of a total of 28 adult goats, all with completely erupted third molars, over a six‐month period. Tooth morphology was captured by medical computed tomography scans at the beginning and end of the controlled feeding experiment, and separation lines between the crown and root segments were defined in the upper right second molar (M2), to gauge absolute wear. Using bootstrapping, significant differences in volume loss between diets L/G and GR/GRS were detected. A small but nevertheless consistent volume gain was noted in the roots, and there was a significant, positive correlation between crown volume loss and root volume gain. This growth could possibly be attributed to the well‐known process of cementum deposition and its relation with a putative feedback mechanism, in place to attenuate wear caused by abrasive diets.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Clinical Diagnostics and Services
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Life Sciences > Physiology
Life Sciences > Animal Science and Zoology
Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > Genetics
Uncontrolled Keywords:3D imaging; cementum; controlled feeding experiment; dental wear; ruminant teeth; tooth volume
Language:English
Date:1 February 2019
Deposited On:18 Feb 2019 13:15
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 09:55
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:2471-5638
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jez.2248
PubMed ID:30511369
Project Information:
  • : FunderH2020
  • : Grant ID681450
  • : Project TitleVERTEBRATE HERBIVORY - Evolution of herbivory in vertebrates: developing combined isotope (Ca, Sr) and dental surface texture analysis as deep time diet proxies
  • : FunderSNF
  • : Grant ID31003A_163300/1
  • : Project Title

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