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Identifying Early Markers of “Late Onset” Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity Symptoms


Murray, Aja Louise; Eisner, Manuel; Obsuth, Ingrid; Ribeaud, D (2020). Identifying Early Markers of “Late Onset” Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity Symptoms. Journal of attention disorders, 24(13):1796-1806.

Abstract

Objective: In recent years, there has been an increased focus on “late onset” ADHD, referring to the onset of symptoms beyond childhood, into adolescence and adulthood. We aimed to identify childhood predictors of ADHD symptom increases over development. Method: We used growth mixture modeling to evaluate predictors of a “late onset” symptom trajectories in a longitudinal cohort study of youth measured at eight points from ages 7 to 15. Results: Individuals with high levels of sensation seeking at age 7 were more likely to show a trajectory of ADHD symptoms characterized by increasing levels from age 7 than persistently low symptom levels. Conclusion: The late versus early onset distinction may align with the distinction between deficits in “bottom-up” versus “top-down” processes previously discussed in relation to ADHD. Results also raise the possibility that later onset symptoms could be predicted based on characteristics in childhood.

Abstract

Objective: In recent years, there has been an increased focus on “late onset” ADHD, referring to the onset of symptoms beyond childhood, into adolescence and adulthood. We aimed to identify childhood predictors of ADHD symptom increases over development. Method: We used growth mixture modeling to evaluate predictors of a “late onset” symptom trajectories in a longitudinal cohort study of youth measured at eight points from ages 7 to 15. Results: Individuals with high levels of sensation seeking at age 7 were more likely to show a trajectory of ADHD symptoms characterized by increasing levels from age 7 than persistently low symptom levels. Conclusion: The late versus early onset distinction may align with the distinction between deficits in “bottom-up” versus “top-down” processes previously discussed in relation to ADHD. Results also raise the possibility that later onset symptoms could be predicted based on characteristics in childhood.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Developmental and Educational Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Clinical Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 November 2020
Deposited On:31 Jul 2019 09:27
Last Modified:30 May 2024 03:43
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:1087-0547
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1087054717705202
PubMed ID:28440106
  • Content: Accepted Version
  • Language: English