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Violent Poly‐Victimization: The Longitudinal Patterns of Physical and Emotional Victimization Throughout Adolescence (11–17 Years)


Obsuth, I; Müller-Johnson, K; Murray, A; Eisner, Manuel; Ribeaud, Denis (2018). Violent Poly‐Victimization: The Longitudinal Patterns of Physical and Emotional Victimization Throughout Adolescence (11–17 Years). Journal of Research on Adolescence, 28(4):786-806.

Abstract

In this study, we aimed to characterize developmental patterns of poly‐victimization in a normative sample of adolescents by applying longitudinal latent class analysis. Using the four most recent waves of data from the Zurich Project on the Social Development of Children and Youths (z‐proso), we identified three classes, or separate groups, of youths with distinct patterns of victimization from age 11 to 17. The largest class represented young people who were least likely to be victimized in any way and at any time. The two smaller groups represented different types of poly‐victimization—a non‐parental and a long‐term parental victimization group. Adolescents in the two groups differed both in the number as well as type of victimization that they experienced at different times. Moreover, class membership also had implications for different mental health outcomes.

Abstract

In this study, we aimed to characterize developmental patterns of poly‐victimization in a normative sample of adolescents by applying longitudinal latent class analysis. Using the four most recent waves of data from the Zurich Project on the Social Development of Children and Youths (z‐proso), we identified three classes, or separate groups, of youths with distinct patterns of victimization from age 11 to 17. The largest class represented young people who were least likely to be victimized in any way and at any time. The two smaller groups represented different types of poly‐victimization—a non‐parental and a long‐term parental victimization group. Adolescents in the two groups differed both in the number as well as type of victimization that they experienced at different times. Moreover, class membership also had implications for different mental health outcomes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Cultural Studies
Social Sciences & Humanities > Developmental and Educational Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:31 Jul 2019 10:19
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 09:55
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1050-8392
Additional Information:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Volume28, Issue4, December 2018, Pages 786-806, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jora.12365. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jora.12365

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