Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Lead poisoning of calves pastured in the target area of a military shooting range


Braun, Ueli; Pusterla, N; Ossent, Pete (1997). Lead poisoning of calves pastured in the target area of a military shooting range. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 139(9):403-407.

Abstract

Five calves, seven to nine months of age, were put on pasture in the target area of a shooting range in early May. Acute lead poisoning occurred in one of the calves after five days of grazing, the remainder became ill one to three days later. The most important symptoms consisted of neurological disturbances and included maniacal movements, opisthotonos, drooling, rolling of the eyes, convulsions, licking, champing of the jaws, bruxism, bellowing and breaking through fences All but one calf, which was euthanatized, died within several hours of the occurrence of the first symptoms. In one calf, the concentration of lead in samples of whole blood (940 micrograms/l), liver (38 mg/kg wet weight) and kidney (30 mg/kg wet weight) were markedly increased Post mortem examination of this calf revealed acute cardiac, renal and pulmonary haemorrhage, acute tubulonephrosis and acute severe pulmonary emphysema. The concentration of lead in the dry matter of a grass and a soil sample from the target zone of the shooting range were 29550 mg/kg and 3900 mg/kg, respectively. Further investigation revealed that this area had been used as a military shooting range for many years, and in the previous year, approximately 20000 bullets with lead contents of either 3.05 g or 8.55 g had been fired. The results of this study indicate that the target area of shooting ranges must not be used for pasture or for food production for animals or humans.

Abstract

Five calves, seven to nine months of age, were put on pasture in the target area of a shooting range in early May. Acute lead poisoning occurred in one of the calves after five days of grazing, the remainder became ill one to three days later. The most important symptoms consisted of neurological disturbances and included maniacal movements, opisthotonos, drooling, rolling of the eyes, convulsions, licking, champing of the jaws, bruxism, bellowing and breaking through fences All but one calf, which was euthanatized, died within several hours of the occurrence of the first symptoms. In one calf, the concentration of lead in samples of whole blood (940 micrograms/l), liver (38 mg/kg wet weight) and kidney (30 mg/kg wet weight) were markedly increased Post mortem examination of this calf revealed acute cardiac, renal and pulmonary haemorrhage, acute tubulonephrosis and acute severe pulmonary emphysema. The concentration of lead in the dry matter of a grass and a soil sample from the target zone of the shooting range were 29550 mg/kg and 3900 mg/kg, respectively. Further investigation revealed that this area had been used as a military shooting range for many years, and in the previous year, approximately 20000 bullets with lead contents of either 3.05 g or 8.55 g had been fired. The results of this study indicate that the target area of shooting ranges must not be used for pasture or for food production for animals or humans.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
21 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Language:English
Date:1997
Deposited On:04 Feb 2019 18:03
Last Modified:15 Apr 2020 23:12
Publisher:Gesellschaft Schweizer Tierärztinnen und Tierärzte
ISSN:0036-7281
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
PubMed ID:9299921

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
Get full-text in a library