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In Vivo Visualization of Tau Accumulation, Microglial Activation, and Brain Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy rTg4510


Ishikawa, Ai; Tokunaga, Masaki; Maeda, Jun; Minamihisamatsu, Takeharu; Shimojo, Masafumi; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ono, Maiko; Ni, Ruiqing; Hirano, Shigeki; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Ji, Bin; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Aoki, Ichio; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto; Sahara, Naruhiko (2018). In Vivo Visualization of Tau Accumulation, Microglial Activation, and Brain Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy rTg4510. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 61(3):1037-1052.

Abstract

Background:Tau imaging using PET is a promising tool for the diagnosis and evaluation of tau-related neurodegenerative disorders, but the relationship among PET-detectable tau, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration is not yet fully understood. Objective:We aimed to elucidate sequential changes in tau accumulation, neuroinflammation, and brain atrophy by PET and MRI in a tauopathy mouse model. Methods:rTg4510 transgenic (tg) mice expressing P301L mutated tau and non-tg mice were examined with brain MRI and PET imaging (analyzed numbers: tg = 17, non-tg = 13; age 2.5∼14 months). As PET probes, [11C]PBB3 (Pyridinyl-Butadienyl-Benzothiazole 3) and [11C]AC-5216 were used to visualize tau pathology and 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) neuroinflammation. Tau pathology and microglia activation were subsequently analyzed by histochemistry. Results:PET studies revealed age-dependent increases in [11C]PBB3 and [11C]AC-5216 signals, which were correlated with age-dependent volume reduction in the forebrain on MRI. However, the increase in [11C]PBB3 signals reached a plateau at age 7 months, and therefore its significant correlation with [11C]AC-5216 disappeared after age 7 months. In contrast, [11C]AC-5216 showed a strong correlation with both age and volume reduction until age 14 months. Histochemical analyses confirmed the relevance of pathological tau accumulation and elevated TSPO immunoreactivity in putative microglia. Conclusion:Our results showed that tau accumulation is associated with neuroinflammation and brain atrophy in a tauopathy mouse model. The time-course of the [11C]PBB3- and TSPO-PET finding suggests that tau deposition triggers progressive neuroinflammation, and the sequential changes can be evaluated in vivo in mouse brains.

Abstract

Background:Tau imaging using PET is a promising tool for the diagnosis and evaluation of tau-related neurodegenerative disorders, but the relationship among PET-detectable tau, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration is not yet fully understood. Objective:We aimed to elucidate sequential changes in tau accumulation, neuroinflammation, and brain atrophy by PET and MRI in a tauopathy mouse model. Methods:rTg4510 transgenic (tg) mice expressing P301L mutated tau and non-tg mice were examined with brain MRI and PET imaging (analyzed numbers: tg = 17, non-tg = 13; age 2.5∼14 months). As PET probes, [11C]PBB3 (Pyridinyl-Butadienyl-Benzothiazole 3) and [11C]AC-5216 were used to visualize tau pathology and 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) neuroinflammation. Tau pathology and microglia activation were subsequently analyzed by histochemistry. Results:PET studies revealed age-dependent increases in [11C]PBB3 and [11C]AC-5216 signals, which were correlated with age-dependent volume reduction in the forebrain on MRI. However, the increase in [11C]PBB3 signals reached a plateau at age 7 months, and therefore its significant correlation with [11C]AC-5216 disappeared after age 7 months. In contrast, [11C]AC-5216 showed a strong correlation with both age and volume reduction until age 14 months. Histochemical analyses confirmed the relevance of pathological tau accumulation and elevated TSPO immunoreactivity in putative microglia. Conclusion:Our results showed that tau accumulation is associated with neuroinflammation and brain atrophy in a tauopathy mouse model. The time-course of the [11C]PBB3- and TSPO-PET finding suggests that tau deposition triggers progressive neuroinflammation, and the sequential changes can be evaluated in vivo in mouse brains.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Neuroscience
Social Sciences & Humanities > Clinical Psychology
Health Sciences > Geriatrics and Gerontology
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Language:English
Date:9 January 2018
Deposited On:05 Mar 2019 16:14
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 10:02
Publisher:I O S Press
ISSN:1387-2877
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3233/jad-170509
PubMed ID:29332041

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