Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Pattern Formation in Binary Colloidal Assemblies: Hidden Symmetries in a Kaleidoscope of Structures


Lotito, Valeria; Zambelli, Tomaso (2018). Pattern Formation in Binary Colloidal Assemblies: Hidden Symmetries in a Kaleidoscope of Structures. Langmuir, 34(26):7827-7843.

Abstract

In this study, we present a detailed investigation of the morphology of binary colloidal structures formed by self-assembly at air/water interface of particles of two different sizes, with a size ratio such that the larger particles do not retain a hexagonal arrangement in the binary assembly. While the structure and symmetry of binary mixtures in which such hexagonal order is preserved has been thoroughly scrutinized, binary colloids in the regime of nonpreservation of the hexagonal order have not been examined with the same level of detail due also to the difficulty in finding analysis tools suitable to recognize hidden symmetries in seemingly amorphous and disordered arrangements. For this purpose, we resorted to a combination of different analysis tools based on computational geometry and computational topology to get a comprehensive picture of the morphology of the assemblies. By carrying out an extensive investigation of binary assemblies in this regime with variable concentration of smaller particles with respect to larger particles, we identify the main patterns that coexist in the apparently disordered assemblies and detect transitions in the symmetries upon increase in the number of small particles. As the concentration of small particles increases, large particle arrangements become more dilute and a transition from hexagonal to rhombic and square symmetries occurs, accompanied also by an increase in clusters of small particles; the relative weight of each specific symmetry can be controlled by varying the composition of the assemblies. The demonstration of the possibility to control the morphology of apparently disordered binary colloidal assemblies by varying experimental conditions and the definition of a route for the investigation of disordered assemblies are important for future studies of complex colloidal patterns to understand self-assembly mechanisms and to tailor the physical properties of colloidal assemblies.

Abstract

In this study, we present a detailed investigation of the morphology of binary colloidal structures formed by self-assembly at air/water interface of particles of two different sizes, with a size ratio such that the larger particles do not retain a hexagonal arrangement in the binary assembly. While the structure and symmetry of binary mixtures in which such hexagonal order is preserved has been thoroughly scrutinized, binary colloids in the regime of nonpreservation of the hexagonal order have not been examined with the same level of detail due also to the difficulty in finding analysis tools suitable to recognize hidden symmetries in seemingly amorphous and disordered arrangements. For this purpose, we resorted to a combination of different analysis tools based on computational geometry and computational topology to get a comprehensive picture of the morphology of the assemblies. By carrying out an extensive investigation of binary assemblies in this regime with variable concentration of smaller particles with respect to larger particles, we identify the main patterns that coexist in the apparently disordered assemblies and detect transitions in the symmetries upon increase in the number of small particles. As the concentration of small particles increases, large particle arrangements become more dilute and a transition from hexagonal to rhombic and square symmetries occurs, accompanied also by an increase in clusters of small particles; the relative weight of each specific symmetry can be controlled by varying the composition of the assemblies. The demonstration of the possibility to control the morphology of apparently disordered binary colloidal assemblies by varying experimental conditions and the definition of a route for the investigation of disordered assemblies are important for future studies of complex colloidal patterns to understand self-assembly mechanisms and to tailor the physical properties of colloidal assemblies.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Spectroscopy, Electrochemistry, General Materials Science, Surfaces and Interfaces, Condensed Matter Physics
Language:English
Date:3 July 2018
Deposited On:06 Mar 2019 08:43
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:23
Publisher:American Chemical Society (ACS)
ISSN:0743-7463
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b01411
PubMed ID:29886749

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library