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Nanosyntax: the basics


Baunaz, Lena; Lander, Eric (2018). Nanosyntax: the basics. In: Baunaz, Lena; De Clercq, Karen; Haegeman, Liliane; Lander, Eric. Exploring Nanosyntax. New York: Oxford University Press, 3-56.

Abstract

This chapter offers a thorough introduction to nanosyntactic theory, a development of the cartographic program in generative grammar. It discusses the foundations on which nanosyntax was conceived, such as the “one feature–one head” maxim and the universal functional sequence (fseq). It also provides a brief comparison of theoretical and terminological issues in nanosyntax vs. the competing framework of Distributed Morphology. It is seen that the syntactic component according to nanosyntax unifies aspects of (what are traditionally called) syntax, morphology, and formal semantics. This is reflected in the tools used to probe linguistic structure in the nanosyntactic approach, such as morphological decomposition, syncretism, and containment. The chapter also discusses the technical details of the syntax–lexicon relation, detailing the matching or spellout process and Starke’s view of spellout-driven movement. This chapter is meant to provide readers with the necessary background to understand and navigate the rest of the chapters in this volume.

Abstract

This chapter offers a thorough introduction to nanosyntactic theory, a development of the cartographic program in generative grammar. It discusses the foundations on which nanosyntax was conceived, such as the “one feature–one head” maxim and the universal functional sequence (fseq). It also provides a brief comparison of theoretical and terminological issues in nanosyntax vs. the competing framework of Distributed Morphology. It is seen that the syntactic component according to nanosyntax unifies aspects of (what are traditionally called) syntax, morphology, and formal semantics. This is reflected in the tools used to probe linguistic structure in the nanosyntactic approach, such as morphological decomposition, syncretism, and containment. The chapter also discusses the technical details of the syntax–lexicon relation, detailing the matching or spellout process and Starke’s view of spellout-driven movement. This chapter is meant to provide readers with the necessary background to understand and navigate the rest of the chapters in this volume.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Romance Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:800 Literature, rhetoric & criticism
470 Latin & Italic languages
410 Linguistics
440 French & related languages
460 Spanish & Portuguese languages
450 Italian, Romanian & related languages
Uncontrolled Keywords:nanosyntax, cartography, morphology, syntax, functional sequence, phrasal spellout, matching, syncretism, containment, lexicon
Language:English
Date:7 June 2018
Deposited On:15 Feb 2019 08:00
Last Modified:30 Apr 2019 07:22
Publisher:Oxford University Press
Series Name:Oxford Studies in Comparative Syntax
ISBN:978-0-19-087675-3
Additional Information:This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Oxford Studies in Comparative Syntax following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190876746.003.0001
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190876746.003.0001
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo-explore/fulldisplay?docid=ebi01_prod011260048&context=L&vid=ZAD&search_scope=default_scope&tab=default_tab&lang=de_DE (Library Catalogue)

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