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Hemimegalencephaly Associated with Congenital Infiltrating Lipomatosis of the Face: A Case Report


Talamanca, Lorenzo Figà; Verdolotti, Tommaso; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; Bernardi, Bruno (2012). Hemimegalencephaly Associated with Congenital Infiltrating Lipomatosis of the Face: A Case Report. Neuropediatrics, 43(06):349-352.

Abstract

Hemimegalencephaly (HME) is a rare congenital malformation of the brain, grossly characterized by enlargement and overdevelopment of one cerebral hemisphere. We describe a 16-month-old patient with facial asymmetry caused by congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face (CILF) associated with ipsilateral HME. Although HME has been described as part of different syndromic diseases, the association of HME with CILF has been rarely reported. Our case and literature review suggest that when the diagnosis of CILF is suspected or established, the possible presence of associated HME has to be considered and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) must be performed even in absence of neurological features, not always present in early stages. MRI also demonstrates the involvement of intracranial structures outside the affected cerebral hemisphere, such as brain stem, cerebellum, cranial nerves, and blood vessels. In our patient, computed tomography of the brain provided detailed information on osseous hypertrophy and skull-base foramina enlargement.

Abstract

Hemimegalencephaly (HME) is a rare congenital malformation of the brain, grossly characterized by enlargement and overdevelopment of one cerebral hemisphere. We describe a 16-month-old patient with facial asymmetry caused by congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face (CILF) associated with ipsilateral HME. Although HME has been described as part of different syndromic diseases, the association of HME with CILF has been rarely reported. Our case and literature review suggest that when the diagnosis of CILF is suspected or established, the possible presence of associated HME has to be considered and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) must be performed even in absence of neurological features, not always present in early stages. MRI also demonstrates the involvement of intracranial structures outside the affected cerebral hemisphere, such as brain stem, cerebellum, cranial nerves, and blood vessels. In our patient, computed tomography of the brain provided detailed information on osseous hypertrophy and skull-base foramina enlargement.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Language:English
Date:18 September 2012
Deposited On:11 Apr 2019 14:16
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 03:12
Publisher:Georg Thieme Verlag
ISSN:0174-304X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0032-1324401
PubMed ID:22991064

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