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Cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC improve survival compared to palliative chemotherapy for biliary carcinoma with peritoneal metastasis: A multi-institutional cohort from PSOGI and BIG RENAPE groups


Amblard, I; Mercier, F; Bartlett, D L; et al; Lehmann, Kuno (2018). Cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC improve survival compared to palliative chemotherapy for biliary carcinoma with peritoneal metastasis: A multi-institutional cohort from PSOGI and BIG RENAPE groups. European Journal of Surgical Oncology, 44(9):1378-1383.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Peritoneal metastasis from biliary carcinoma (PMC) is associated with poor prognosis when treated with chemotherapy.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact on survival of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), and compare with conventional palliative chemotherapy for patients with PMC.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective multicenter international database was retrospectively searched to identify all patients with PMC treated with a potentially curative CRS/HIPEC (CRS/HIPEC group). The overall survival (OS) was compared to patients with PMC treated with palliative chemotherapy (systemic chemotherapy group). Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method and compared with Log-Rank test.
RESULTS: Between 1995 and 2015, 34 patients were included in the surgical group, and compared to 21 in the systemic chemotherapy group. In the surgical group, median peritoneal cancer index was 9 (range 3-26), macroscopically complete resection was obtained for 25 patients (73%). There was more gallbladder localization in the surgical group compared to the chemotherapy group (35% vs. 18%, p = 0.001). Median OS was 21.4 and 9.3 months for surgical and chemotherapy group, respectively (p=0.007). Three-year overall survival was 30% and 10% for surgical and chemotherapy group, respectively.
CONCLUSION: Treatment with CRS and HIPEC for biliary carcinoma with peritoneal metastasis is feasible and may provide survival benefit when compared to palliative chemotherapy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Peritoneal metastasis from biliary carcinoma (PMC) is associated with poor prognosis when treated with chemotherapy.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact on survival of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), and compare with conventional palliative chemotherapy for patients with PMC.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective multicenter international database was retrospectively searched to identify all patients with PMC treated with a potentially curative CRS/HIPEC (CRS/HIPEC group). The overall survival (OS) was compared to patients with PMC treated with palliative chemotherapy (systemic chemotherapy group). Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method and compared with Log-Rank test.
RESULTS: Between 1995 and 2015, 34 patients were included in the surgical group, and compared to 21 in the systemic chemotherapy group. In the surgical group, median peritoneal cancer index was 9 (range 3-26), macroscopically complete resection was obtained for 25 patients (73%). There was more gallbladder localization in the surgical group compared to the chemotherapy group (35% vs. 18%, p = 0.001). Median OS was 21.4 and 9.3 months for surgical and chemotherapy group, respectively (p=0.007). Three-year overall survival was 30% and 10% for surgical and chemotherapy group, respectively.
CONCLUSION: Treatment with CRS and HIPEC for biliary carcinoma with peritoneal metastasis is feasible and may provide survival benefit when compared to palliative chemotherapy.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Oncology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Surgery, Oncology, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 September 2018
Deposited On:07 Mar 2019 11:10
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 10:11
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0748-7983
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejso.2018.04.023
PubMed ID:30131104

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