Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Sensorimotor plasticity after spinal cord injury: a longitudinal and translational study


Jutzeler, Catherine R; Streijger, Femke; Aguilar, Juan; Shortt, Katelyn; Manouchehri, Neda; Okon, Elena; Hupp, Markus; Curt, Armin; Kwon, Brian K; Kramer, John L K (2019). Sensorimotor plasticity after spinal cord injury: a longitudinal and translational study. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, 6(1):68-82.

Abstract

Objective
The objective was to track and compare the progression of neuroplastic changes in a large animal model and humans with spinal cord injury.
Methods
A total of 37 individuals with acute traumatic spinal cord injury were followed over time (1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-injury) with repeated neurophysiological assessments. Somatosensory and motor evoked potentials were recorded in the upper extremities above the level of injury. In a reverse-translational approach, similar neurophysiological techniques were examined in a porcine model of thoracic spinal cord injury. Twelve Yucatan mini-pigs underwent a contusive spinal cord injury at T10 and tracked with somatosensory and motor evoked potentials assessments in the fore- and hind limbs pre- (baseline, post-laminectomy) and post-injury (10 min, 3 h, 12 weeks).
Results
In both humans and pigs, the sensory responses in the cranial coordinates of upper extremities/forelimbs progressively increased from immediately post-injury to later time points. Motor responses in the forelimbs increased immediately after experimental injury in pigs, remaining elevated at 12 weeks. In humans, motor evoked potentials were significantly higher at 1-month (and remained so at 1 year) compared to normative values.
Conclusions
Despite notable differences between experimental models and the human condition, the brain's response to spinal cord injury is remarkably similar between humans and pigs. Our findings further underscore the utility of this large animal model in translational spinal cord injury research.

Abstract

Objective
The objective was to track and compare the progression of neuroplastic changes in a large animal model and humans with spinal cord injury.
Methods
A total of 37 individuals with acute traumatic spinal cord injury were followed over time (1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-injury) with repeated neurophysiological assessments. Somatosensory and motor evoked potentials were recorded in the upper extremities above the level of injury. In a reverse-translational approach, similar neurophysiological techniques were examined in a porcine model of thoracic spinal cord injury. Twelve Yucatan mini-pigs underwent a contusive spinal cord injury at T10 and tracked with somatosensory and motor evoked potentials assessments in the fore- and hind limbs pre- (baseline, post-laminectomy) and post-injury (10 min, 3 h, 12 weeks).
Results
In both humans and pigs, the sensory responses in the cranial coordinates of upper extremities/forelimbs progressively increased from immediately post-injury to later time points. Motor responses in the forelimbs increased immediately after experimental injury in pigs, remaining elevated at 12 weeks. In humans, motor evoked potentials were significantly higher at 1-month (and remained so at 1 year) compared to normative values.
Conclusions
Despite notable differences between experimental models and the human condition, the brain's response to spinal cord injury is remarkably similar between humans and pigs. Our findings further underscore the utility of this large animal model in translational spinal cord injury research.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

31 downloads since deposited on 15 Mar 2019
31 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2019
Deposited On:15 Mar 2019 13:14
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:25
Publisher:Wiley Open Access
ISSN:2328-9503
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/acn3.679
PubMed ID:30656185

Download

Gold Open Access

Download PDF  'Sensorimotor plasticity after spinal cord injury: a longitudinal and translational study'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 936kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)