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A realistic multimodal modeling approach for the evaluation of distributed source analysis: application to sLORETA


Cosandier-Rimélé, D; Ramantani, G; Zentner, J; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Dümpelmann, M (2017). A realistic multimodal modeling approach for the evaluation of distributed source analysis: application to sLORETA. Journal of Neural Engineering, 14(5):056008.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Electrical source localization (ESL) deriving from scalp EEG and, in recent years, from intracranial EEG (iEEG), is an established method in epilepsy surgery workup. We aimed to validate the distributed ESL derived from scalp EEG and iEEG, particularly regarding the spatial extent of the source, using a realistic epileptic spike activity simulator. APPROACH ESL was applied to the averaged scalp EEG and iEEG spikes of two patients with drug-resistant structural epilepsy. The ESL results for both patients were used to outline the location and extent of epileptic cortical patches, which served as the basis for designing a spatiotemporal source model. EEG signals for both modalities were then generated for different anatomic locations and spatial extents. ESL was subsequently performed on simulated signals with sLORETA, a commonly used distributed algorithm. ESL accuracy was quantitatively assessed for iEEG and scalp EEG. MAIN RESULTS The source volume was overestimated by sLORETA at both EEG scales, with the error increasing with source size, particularly for iEEG. For larger sources, ESL accuracy drastically decreased, and reconstruction volumes shifted to the center of the head for iEEG, while remaining stable for scalp EEG. Overall, the mislocalization of the reconstructed source was more pronounced for iEEG. SIGNIFICANCE We present a novel multiscale framework for the evaluation of distributed ESL, based on realistic multiscale EEG simulations. Our findings support that reconstruction results for scalp EEG are often more accurate than for iEEG, owing to the superior 3D coverage of the head. Particularly the iEEG-derived reconstruction results for larger, widespread generators should be treated with caution.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Electrical source localization (ESL) deriving from scalp EEG and, in recent years, from intracranial EEG (iEEG), is an established method in epilepsy surgery workup. We aimed to validate the distributed ESL derived from scalp EEG and iEEG, particularly regarding the spatial extent of the source, using a realistic epileptic spike activity simulator. APPROACH ESL was applied to the averaged scalp EEG and iEEG spikes of two patients with drug-resistant structural epilepsy. The ESL results for both patients were used to outline the location and extent of epileptic cortical patches, which served as the basis for designing a spatiotemporal source model. EEG signals for both modalities were then generated for different anatomic locations and spatial extents. ESL was subsequently performed on simulated signals with sLORETA, a commonly used distributed algorithm. ESL accuracy was quantitatively assessed for iEEG and scalp EEG. MAIN RESULTS The source volume was overestimated by sLORETA at both EEG scales, with the error increasing with source size, particularly for iEEG. For larger sources, ESL accuracy drastically decreased, and reconstruction volumes shifted to the center of the head for iEEG, while remaining stable for scalp EEG. Overall, the mislocalization of the reconstructed source was more pronounced for iEEG. SIGNIFICANCE We present a novel multiscale framework for the evaluation of distributed ESL, based on realistic multiscale EEG simulations. Our findings support that reconstruction results for scalp EEG are often more accurate than for iEEG, owing to the superior 3D coverage of the head. Particularly the iEEG-derived reconstruction results for larger, widespread generators should be treated with caution.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Biomedical Engineering
Life Sciences > Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:October 2017
Deposited On:12 Mar 2019 16:17
Last Modified:28 Jul 2020 14:07
Publisher:IOP Publishing
ISSN:1741-2552
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-2552/aa7db1
PubMed ID:28677591

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