Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Desmopressin for treating nocturia in patients with multiple sclerosis: A systematic review: A report from the Neuro-Urology Promotion Committee of the International Continence Society (ICS)


Phé, Véronique; Schneider, Marc P; Peyronnet, Benoit; Abo Youssef, Nadim; Mordasini, Livio; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Bachmann, Lucas M; Kessler, Thomas M (2019). Desmopressin for treating nocturia in patients with multiple sclerosis: A systematic review: A report from the Neuro-Urology Promotion Committee of the International Continence Society (ICS). Neurourology and Urodynamics, 38(2):563-571.

Abstract

AIMS
To systematically assess all available evidence on efficacy and safety of desmopressin for treating nocturia in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).
METHODS
This systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Studies were identified by electronic search of Cochrane register, Embase, Medline, Scopus (last search March 3, 2018) and by screening of reference lists and reviews.
RESULTS
After screening of 7015 abstracts, 8 prospective, and 1 retrospective studies were included enrolling a total of 178 patients. The mean patient age ranged between 43 and 51 years. A significant decrease in the number of micturitions per night was reported in 5 studies. An increase in the maximum hours of uninterrupted sleep was only found in two studies. A significant reduction of the volume of nocturnal incontinence was described in one study. The patient satisfaction rates ranged from 56% to 82%. The rate of adverse events was between 0% and 57.9%. The rate of hyponatremia ranged from 0% to 23.5% and other commonly reported adverse events were headache, nausea, fluid retention, rhinitis/epistaxis, malaise, and swollen ankles. Risk of bias and confounding was relevant in all studies.
CONCLUSIONS
Preliminary data suggest that desmopressin might be effective for treating nocturia in patients with MS. However, adverse events are relatively common, the overall quality of evidence is low and the number of studied patients is very limited. Further studies with newer formulations of desmopressin are highly warranted.

Abstract

AIMS
To systematically assess all available evidence on efficacy and safety of desmopressin for treating nocturia in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).
METHODS
This systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Studies were identified by electronic search of Cochrane register, Embase, Medline, Scopus (last search March 3, 2018) and by screening of reference lists and reviews.
RESULTS
After screening of 7015 abstracts, 8 prospective, and 1 retrospective studies were included enrolling a total of 178 patients. The mean patient age ranged between 43 and 51 years. A significant decrease in the number of micturitions per night was reported in 5 studies. An increase in the maximum hours of uninterrupted sleep was only found in two studies. A significant reduction of the volume of nocturnal incontinence was described in one study. The patient satisfaction rates ranged from 56% to 82%. The rate of adverse events was between 0% and 57.9%. The rate of hyponatremia ranged from 0% to 23.5% and other commonly reported adverse events were headache, nausea, fluid retention, rhinitis/epistaxis, malaise, and swollen ankles. Risk of bias and confounding was relevant in all studies.
CONCLUSIONS
Preliminary data suggest that desmopressin might be effective for treating nocturia in patients with MS. However, adverse events are relatively common, the overall quality of evidence is low and the number of studied patients is very limited. Further studies with newer formulations of desmopressin are highly warranted.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:17 January 2019
Deposited On:15 Mar 2019 13:20
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:26
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0733-2467
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.23921
PubMed ID:30653737

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library