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Bösartiges Katarrhalfieber in der Schweiz: I.Teil: Epidemiologie


Müller-Doblies, U U; Egli, J; Li, H; Braun, Ueli; Ackermann, Mathias (2001). Bösartiges Katarrhalfieber in der Schweiz: I.Teil: Epidemiologie. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 143(4):173-183.

Abstract

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a usually fatal infectious disease of cattle with global distribution. Based on the recent introduction of a diagnostic PCR assay and a competitive inhibition ELISA (ciELISA) epidemiological data were collected on field cases in Switzerland. Throughout a three-year period, an MCF incidence of 0.6@1000 was observed, with a gradient of cases from Eastern to Western Switzerland. While the cantons Wallis, Vaud and Geneva reported no and the remaining western cantons only reported a few cases, the highest incidence was observed in the cantons Appenzell Innerrhoden, Lucern, Glarus, Grison, St. Gallen, Schwyz, and Thurgau. MCF occurred seasonally and an age-related clustering was also observed. About 50% of all cases and all outbreaks with more than one animal in a single herd occurred between April and June. Animals between six months and two years were strongly over represented. Observations on four surviving cattle showed that the outcome of the disease is not invariably fatal and that these persistently infected cows can produce healthy negative calves. Investigations on the aetiology indicate that the main reservoir for OvHV-2 is in sheep and possibly goats, while cattle do not normally harbor the virus. An OvHV-2 negative sheep herd was raised from lambs, which were reared colostrum-free and in isolation from their mothers. The success rate clearly indicated that vertical intrauterine infection is not the main mode of transmission among sheep. Therefore, horizontal, seasonally occurring transmission of OvHV-2 among sheep has to be assumed.

Abstract

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a usually fatal infectious disease of cattle with global distribution. Based on the recent introduction of a diagnostic PCR assay and a competitive inhibition ELISA (ciELISA) epidemiological data were collected on field cases in Switzerland. Throughout a three-year period, an MCF incidence of 0.6@1000 was observed, with a gradient of cases from Eastern to Western Switzerland. While the cantons Wallis, Vaud and Geneva reported no and the remaining western cantons only reported a few cases, the highest incidence was observed in the cantons Appenzell Innerrhoden, Lucern, Glarus, Grison, St. Gallen, Schwyz, and Thurgau. MCF occurred seasonally and an age-related clustering was also observed. About 50% of all cases and all outbreaks with more than one animal in a single herd occurred between April and June. Animals between six months and two years were strongly over represented. Observations on four surviving cattle showed that the outcome of the disease is not invariably fatal and that these persistently infected cows can produce healthy negative calves. Investigations on the aetiology indicate that the main reservoir for OvHV-2 is in sheep and possibly goats, while cattle do not normally harbor the virus. An OvHV-2 negative sheep herd was raised from lambs, which were reared colostrum-free and in isolation from their mothers. The success rate clearly indicated that vertical intrauterine infection is not the main mode of transmission among sheep. Therefore, horizontal, seasonally occurring transmission of OvHV-2 among sheep has to be assumed.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Malignant catarrhal fever in Switzerland. 1.Epidemiology
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:German
Date:April 2001
Deposited On:28 Feb 2019 17:33
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:29
Publisher:Gesellschaft Schweizer Tierärztinnen und Tierärzte
ISSN:0036-7281
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
PubMed ID:11344942

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