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Border Disease in einem Schafbetrieb


Braun, Ueli; Hilbe, Monika; Ehrensperger, F; Salis, F; Alther, P; Strasser, M; Stalder, H P; Peterhans, E (2002). Border Disease in einem Schafbetrieb. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 144(8):419-426.

Abstract

This report describes border disease in a flock of sheep in Switzerland. In April 2001, three ewes in a flock of 41 sheep gave birth to lambs that had generalized tremors and excessively hairy fleece. One of these, a three-week-old female lamb, was referred to our clinic for further diagnostic work-up. The lamb was very nervous, bleated constantly and had generalized muscle tremors, which were more pronounced in the head region. Hind end ataxia was observed, and the lamb was slow to correct its posture when the hind limbs were abducted, adducted or crossed. Blood samples were collected every six weeks to determine antibody titres to pestivirus and for virus isolation via cell culture. A skin biopsy sample was also collected and examined immunohistochemically for pestivirus antigen. Antibody titres in the first tests were suspicious and those of the second were negative. Pestivirus was identified in cell culture, and the skin biopsy sample was positive for pestivirus antigen. Blood samples were collected from all of the ewes and lambs and the buck for virus isolation via cell culture and determination of pestivirus antibody titres. Thirty-one animals were seropositive, six had borderline antibody titres and four were seronegative. Pestivirus was isolated from eight animals, which included the lamb described in this report. Of the virus-positive animals, three were seronegative, three others had borderline titres and two were seropositive. Six of the eight viruses isolated from cell culture were further characterized genetically via retrotranscription and polymerase chain reaction and subsequent sequencing. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the causative agent was border disease virus. This is the first time that border disease virus has been isolated in Switzerland. The lamb referred to our clinic was observed for three months; it was then euthanatised and a postmortem examination was performed. Immunohistochemical examination of numerous organs revealed pestivirus antigen. The source of infection was though to be infected sheep from another flock, which shared a pasture. All antigen-positive animals were slaughtered.

Abstract

This report describes border disease in a flock of sheep in Switzerland. In April 2001, three ewes in a flock of 41 sheep gave birth to lambs that had generalized tremors and excessively hairy fleece. One of these, a three-week-old female lamb, was referred to our clinic for further diagnostic work-up. The lamb was very nervous, bleated constantly and had generalized muscle tremors, which were more pronounced in the head region. Hind end ataxia was observed, and the lamb was slow to correct its posture when the hind limbs were abducted, adducted or crossed. Blood samples were collected every six weeks to determine antibody titres to pestivirus and for virus isolation via cell culture. A skin biopsy sample was also collected and examined immunohistochemically for pestivirus antigen. Antibody titres in the first tests were suspicious and those of the second were negative. Pestivirus was identified in cell culture, and the skin biopsy sample was positive for pestivirus antigen. Blood samples were collected from all of the ewes and lambs and the buck for virus isolation via cell culture and determination of pestivirus antibody titres. Thirty-one animals were seropositive, six had borderline antibody titres and four were seronegative. Pestivirus was isolated from eight animals, which included the lamb described in this report. Of the virus-positive animals, three were seronegative, three others had borderline titres and two were seropositive. Six of the eight viruses isolated from cell culture were further characterized genetically via retrotranscription and polymerase chain reaction and subsequent sequencing. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the causative agent was border disease virus. This is the first time that border disease virus has been isolated in Switzerland. The lamb referred to our clinic was observed for three months; it was then euthanatised and a postmortem examination was performed. Immunohistochemical examination of numerous organs revealed pestivirus antigen. The source of infection was though to be infected sheep from another flock, which shared a pasture. All antigen-positive animals were slaughtered.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Border disease in a flock of sheep
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:German
Date:August 2002
Deposited On:03 Mar 2019 16:51
Last Modified:03 Mar 2019 16:53
Publisher:Gesellschaft Schweizer Tierärztinnen und Tierärzte
ISSN:0036-7281
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/0036-7281.144.8.419
PubMed ID:12224448

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