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Initial Validation of the Dyadic Coping Inventory for Financial Stress


Falconier, Mariana K; Rusu, Petruta P; Bodenmann, Guy (2019). Initial Validation of the Dyadic Coping Inventory for Financial Stress. Stress and Health:ePub ahead of print.

Abstract

Financial stress can have a detrimental impact on a couple's relationship but there is no validated instrument to assess the way couples cope with financial stress. This study sought to validate the Dyadic Coping Inventory for Financial Strain (DCIFS), an adaptation of the Dyadic Coping Inventory to financial stressors, with self-report data collected from 132 heterosexual couples seeking couple and/or family therapy services. Confirmatory Factor Analysis results supported a 23-item version consisting of the following subscales for both men and women: Stress Communication by Oneself and by Partner; Emotion- and Problem-Focused Supportive Dyadic Coping (DC) by Oneself and by Partner; Negative DC by Oneself and by Partner; Emotion- and Problem-Focused Common DC; and Evaluation of DC (Chi-square test: Men: χ (175) = 310.11, p =.00, Women: χ (175) = 242.88, p =.00. Results also supported the hypothesized factorial structure for the aggregated subscales of DC by Oneself and by Partner as well as the discriminant, predictive, and convergent validity of the DCIFS. Findings associated with the Stress Communication subscales suggest that this DC dimension may behave differently depending on the type of stressor. Further studies should be conducted to replicate the DCIFS factorial structure with longitudinal data from couples not seeking couple or family therapy.

Abstract

Financial stress can have a detrimental impact on a couple's relationship but there is no validated instrument to assess the way couples cope with financial stress. This study sought to validate the Dyadic Coping Inventory for Financial Strain (DCIFS), an adaptation of the Dyadic Coping Inventory to financial stressors, with self-report data collected from 132 heterosexual couples seeking couple and/or family therapy services. Confirmatory Factor Analysis results supported a 23-item version consisting of the following subscales for both men and women: Stress Communication by Oneself and by Partner; Emotion- and Problem-Focused Supportive Dyadic Coping (DC) by Oneself and by Partner; Negative DC by Oneself and by Partner; Emotion- and Problem-Focused Common DC; and Evaluation of DC (Chi-square test: Men: χ (175) = 310.11, p =.00, Women: χ (175) = 242.88, p =.00. Results also supported the hypothesized factorial structure for the aggregated subscales of DC by Oneself and by Partner as well as the discriminant, predictive, and convergent validity of the DCIFS. Findings associated with the Stress Communication subscales suggest that this DC dimension may behave differently depending on the type of stressor. Further studies should be conducted to replicate the DCIFS factorial structure with longitudinal data from couples not seeking couple or family therapy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 March 2019
Deposited On:04 Mar 2019 14:01
Last Modified:04 Mar 2019 14:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1532-3005
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/smi.2862
PubMed ID:30821892

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