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Character Strengths and Job Satisfaction: Differential Relationships Across Occupational Groups and Adulthood


Heintz, Sonja; Ruch, Willibald (2019). Character Strengths and Job Satisfaction: Differential Relationships Across Occupational Groups and Adulthood. Applied Research in Quality of Life:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Character strengths are a central construct within positive psychology, and their importance for the workplace was supported recently. Little is known, however, which strengths matter the most at the workplace. The aim of the present investigation was thus to assess the relationship between the level of the 24 character strengths with overall job satisfaction in a general working population (N = 12,499) as well as in eight occupational subgroups (nurses, physicians, supervisors, office workers, clinical psychologists, social workers/educators, economists, and secondary-school teachers) and in six age groups (from 18 to 61+ years) and to compare the overall level of character strengths across the eight occupational subgroups. Results showed that, similar to life satisfaction, zest, hope, curiosity, love, and gratitude, and emotional strengths in general, related most strongly to overall job satisfaction. However, the relationships of the strengths with job satisfaction differed depending on the facet of job satisfaction, the occupational subgroup, and the age group under study. Knowing which individual strengths as well as strengths factors are more important for specific working populations can help to develop and apply more effective strength-based interventions in the workplace, thus improving positive and reducing negative work-related outcomes.

Abstract

Character strengths are a central construct within positive psychology, and their importance for the workplace was supported recently. Little is known, however, which strengths matter the most at the workplace. The aim of the present investigation was thus to assess the relationship between the level of the 24 character strengths with overall job satisfaction in a general working population (N = 12,499) as well as in eight occupational subgroups (nurses, physicians, supervisors, office workers, clinical psychologists, social workers/educators, economists, and secondary-school teachers) and in six age groups (from 18 to 61+ years) and to compare the overall level of character strengths across the eight occupational subgroups. Results showed that, similar to life satisfaction, zest, hope, curiosity, love, and gratitude, and emotional strengths in general, related most strongly to overall job satisfaction. However, the relationships of the strengths with job satisfaction differed depending on the facet of job satisfaction, the occupational subgroup, and the age group under study. Knowing which individual strengths as well as strengths factors are more important for specific working populations can help to develop and apply more effective strength-based interventions in the workplace, thus improving positive and reducing negative work-related outcomes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Life-span and Life-course Studies
Language:English
Date:8 January 2019
Deposited On:05 Mar 2019 15:45
Last Modified:30 Jun 2019 07:23
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1871-2584
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-018-9691-3
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_172723
  • : Project TitleStudies on the Advancement of Character Research

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