Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Retrospective evaluation of the efficacy of minimally invasive, fluoroscopic-assisted reduction and stabilisation of unicondylar humeral fractures


Au Yong, J A; Lewis, D D; Evans, R B; Kim, S E; Pozzi, Antonio (2018). Retrospective evaluation of the efficacy of minimally invasive, fluoroscopic-assisted reduction and stabilisation of unicondylar humeral fractures. Australian Veterinary Journal, 96(8):302-307.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:This study evaluated the proficiency in executing closed, fluoroscopic-assisted reduction of unicondylar humeral fractures. The following were hypothesised: experienced surgeons would be highly successful in performing closed reduction; body weight, time to surgery and surgeon experience would influence the reduction method; and the reduction method would not affect technical aspects of the repair.
METHODS: All unicondylar humeral fractures stabilised between January 2007 and January 2017 were reviewed. Signalment and time to surgery, experience of the attending surgeon, and the initial and definitive reduction methods were recorded. Initial and subsequent postoperative radiographs were used to assess fracture reduction, implant placement and complications. Univariate polychotomous logistic regressions, Fisher's exact test, Kruskal-Wallis rank sums non-parametric test or equivalence tests were used to compare parameters evaluated based on the approach employed (P < 0.05 significant).
RESULTS:A total of 36 dogs with 37 fractures were identified (median weight: 5.4 kg; median time to surgery: 3 days). Of these, 11 of 15 attempted closed reductions were successful. Successful closed reductions had shorter times to surgery than limited open or open reductions (P = 0.009). Age, weight and surgeon experience did not influence the definitive reduction method. Technical aspects of reduction and stabilisation were similar among the reduction methods. Surgery times were shorter for closed reductions (P = 0.034). Of the fractures, 75% healed without complications and 85% had excellent long-term function.
CONCLUSION: The results suggested that closed, fluoroscopic-assisted reduction is a proficient (73% successful) and efficient (shorter surgery times with comparable technical results compared with other limited open and open reduction) means of stabilising acute unicondylar humeral fractures.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:This study evaluated the proficiency in executing closed, fluoroscopic-assisted reduction of unicondylar humeral fractures. The following were hypothesised: experienced surgeons would be highly successful in performing closed reduction; body weight, time to surgery and surgeon experience would influence the reduction method; and the reduction method would not affect technical aspects of the repair.
METHODS: All unicondylar humeral fractures stabilised between January 2007 and January 2017 were reviewed. Signalment and time to surgery, experience of the attending surgeon, and the initial and definitive reduction methods were recorded. Initial and subsequent postoperative radiographs were used to assess fracture reduction, implant placement and complications. Univariate polychotomous logistic regressions, Fisher's exact test, Kruskal-Wallis rank sums non-parametric test or equivalence tests were used to compare parameters evaluated based on the approach employed (P < 0.05 significant).
RESULTS:A total of 36 dogs with 37 fractures were identified (median weight: 5.4 kg; median time to surgery: 3 days). Of these, 11 of 15 attempted closed reductions were successful. Successful closed reductions had shorter times to surgery than limited open or open reductions (P = 0.009). Age, weight and surgeon experience did not influence the definitive reduction method. Technical aspects of reduction and stabilisation were similar among the reduction methods. Surgery times were shorter for closed reductions (P = 0.034). Of the fractures, 75% healed without complications and 85% had excellent long-term function.
CONCLUSION: The results suggested that closed, fluoroscopic-assisted reduction is a proficient (73% successful) and efficient (shorter surgery times with comparable technical results compared with other limited open and open reduction) means of stabilising acute unicondylar humeral fractures.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

31 downloads since deposited on 09 Mar 2019
30 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:minimally invasive surgery; orthopaedic surgery; small animal surgery; unicondylar humeral fracture
Language:English
Date:August 2018
Deposited On:09 Mar 2019 09:52
Last Modified:09 Dec 2019 12:03
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0005-0423
Additional Information:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Au Yong, J. , Lewis, D. , Evans, R. , Kim, S. and Pozzi, A. (2018), Retrospective evaluation of the efficacy of minimally invasive, fluoroscopic‐assisted reduction and stabilisation of unicondylar humeral fractures. Aust Vet J, 96: 302-307, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/avj.12723. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. (http://www.wileyauthors.com/self-archiving)
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/avj.12723
PubMed ID:30129027

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Retrospective evaluation of the efficacy of minimally invasive, fluoroscopic-assisted reduction and stabilisation of unicondylar humeral fractures'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 591kB
View at publisher