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Teaching and proficiency assessment for arthroscopy in veterinary surgery: A 2017 survey of diplomates and residents of the American and European College of Veterinary Surgeons


Maurin, Marie-Pauline; Pozzi, Antonio; Bleedorn, Jason; McNally, Turlough P; Cuddy, Laura C (2018). Teaching and proficiency assessment for arthroscopy in veterinary surgery: A 2017 survey of diplomates and residents of the American and European College of Veterinary Surgeons. Veterinary Surgery, 47(8):E70-E78.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine current methods of arthroscopic skills training and proficiency assessment, identify skills considered fundamental to arthroscopy, and evaluate desire for a formal training and assessment program.
STUDY DESIGN: Anonymized electronic survey.
SAMPLE POPULATION: Diplomates and residents of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and European College of Veterinary Surgeons (ECVS).
METHODS: An electronic survey was distributed in commercial software (Qualtrics, Provo, Utah). Questions were divided into 4 categories: (1) demographics, (2) arthroscopy experience, (3) teaching, and (4) proficiency assessment. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Comparisons between groups were performed by using χ , t tests, and 1-way ANOVA (P ≤ .05).
RESULTS: In total, 429 diplomates and 149 residents responded (response rate 28%). Overall, 80% of respondents trained using clinical cases. Barriers to simulator training included cadaver/simulator availability and time. Skills deemed most fundamental included anatomic knowledge, precise portal placement, triangulation, and image orientation. Overall, 90% of respondents supported a formal training program with requirement to demonstrate proficiency; 80% believed this should be part of standard ACVS/ECVS residency training.
CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic skills are taught by using clinical cases, with subjective proficiency assessment. Fundamental skills are those that may be taught using simulators. There is enthusiasm for formal arthroscopic skills training and assessment.
CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Improved acquisition and assessment of fundamental arthroscopic skills is indicated. A validated methodology for formal training using simulators, minimizing morbidity, and facilitating objective evaluation is warranted. This is the first phase of a project to develop and validate a simulator program.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine current methods of arthroscopic skills training and proficiency assessment, identify skills considered fundamental to arthroscopy, and evaluate desire for a formal training and assessment program.
STUDY DESIGN: Anonymized electronic survey.
SAMPLE POPULATION: Diplomates and residents of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and European College of Veterinary Surgeons (ECVS).
METHODS: An electronic survey was distributed in commercial software (Qualtrics, Provo, Utah). Questions were divided into 4 categories: (1) demographics, (2) arthroscopy experience, (3) teaching, and (4) proficiency assessment. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Comparisons between groups were performed by using χ , t tests, and 1-way ANOVA (P ≤ .05).
RESULTS: In total, 429 diplomates and 149 residents responded (response rate 28%). Overall, 80% of respondents trained using clinical cases. Barriers to simulator training included cadaver/simulator availability and time. Skills deemed most fundamental included anatomic knowledge, precise portal placement, triangulation, and image orientation. Overall, 90% of respondents supported a formal training program with requirement to demonstrate proficiency; 80% believed this should be part of standard ACVS/ECVS residency training.
CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic skills are taught by using clinical cases, with subjective proficiency assessment. Fundamental skills are those that may be taught using simulators. There is enthusiasm for formal arthroscopic skills training and assessment.
CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Improved acquisition and assessment of fundamental arthroscopic skills is indicated. A validated methodology for formal training using simulators, minimizing morbidity, and facilitating objective evaluation is warranted. This is the first phase of a project to develop and validate a simulator program.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Language:English
Date:November 2018
Deposited On:09 Mar 2019 10:04
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 10:25
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0161-3499
Additional Information:For accepted manuscripts: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Maurin M‐P, Pozzi A, Bleedorn J, McNally TP, Cuddy LC. Teaching and proficiency assessment for arthroscopy in veterinary surgery: A 2017 survey of diplomates and residents of the American and European College of Veterinary Surgeons. Veterinary Surgery. 2018;47:E70–E78, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/vsu.12951. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. (http://www.wileyauthors.com/self-archiving)
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/vsu.12951
PubMed ID:30267588

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