Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Prognostic values of fasting hyperglycaemia in non-diabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome: A prospective cohort study


Gencer, Baris; Rigamonti, Fabio; Nanchen, David; Klingenberg, Roland; Räber, Lorenz; Moutzouri, Elisavet; Auer, Reto; Carballo, David; Heg, Dik; Windecker, Stephan; Lüscher, Thomas Felix; Matter, Christian M; Rodondi, Nicolas; Mach, François; Roffi, Marco (2020). Prognostic values of fasting hyperglycaemia in non-diabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome: A prospective cohort study. European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care, 9(6):589-598.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Controversy remains regarding the prevalence of hyperglycaemia in non-diabetic patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome and its prognostic value for long-term outcomes.

METHODS AND RESULTS

We evaluated the prevalence of hyperglycaemia (defined as fasting glycaemia ⩾10 mmol/l) among patients with no known diabetes at the time of enrolment in the prospective Special Program University Medicine-Acute Coronary Syndromes cohort, as well as its impact on all-cause death, myocardial infarction, stroke and incidence of diabetes at one year. Among 3858 acute coronary syndrome patients enrolled between December 2009-December 2014, 709 (18.4%) had known diabetes, while 112 (3.6%) of non-diabetic patients had hyperglycaemia at admission. Compared with non-hyperglycaemic patients, hyperglycaemic individuals were more likely to present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and acute heart failure. At discharge, hyperglycaemic patients were more frequently treated with glucose-lowering agents (8.9% vs 0.66%, p<0.001). At one-year, adjudicated all-cause death was significantly higher in non-diabetic patients presenting with hyperglycaemia compared with patients with no hyperglycaemia (5.4% vs 2.2%, p=0.041) and hyperglycaemia was a significant predictor of one-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 2.39, 95% confidence interval 1.03-5.56). Among patients with hyperglycaemia, 9.8% had developed diabetes at one-year, while the corresponding proportion among patients without hyperglycaemia was 1.8% ( p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, hyperglycaemia at presentation predicted the onset of treated diabetes at one-year (odds ratio 4.15, 95% confidence interval 1.59-10.86; p=0.004).

CONCLUSION

Among non-diabetic patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome, a fasting hyperglycaemia of ⩾10 mmol/l predicted one-year mortality and was associated with a four-fold increased risk of developing diabetes at one year.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Controversy remains regarding the prevalence of hyperglycaemia in non-diabetic patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome and its prognostic value for long-term outcomes.

METHODS AND RESULTS

We evaluated the prevalence of hyperglycaemia (defined as fasting glycaemia ⩾10 mmol/l) among patients with no known diabetes at the time of enrolment in the prospective Special Program University Medicine-Acute Coronary Syndromes cohort, as well as its impact on all-cause death, myocardial infarction, stroke and incidence of diabetes at one year. Among 3858 acute coronary syndrome patients enrolled between December 2009-December 2014, 709 (18.4%) had known diabetes, while 112 (3.6%) of non-diabetic patients had hyperglycaemia at admission. Compared with non-hyperglycaemic patients, hyperglycaemic individuals were more likely to present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and acute heart failure. At discharge, hyperglycaemic patients were more frequently treated with glucose-lowering agents (8.9% vs 0.66%, p<0.001). At one-year, adjudicated all-cause death was significantly higher in non-diabetic patients presenting with hyperglycaemia compared with patients with no hyperglycaemia (5.4% vs 2.2%, p=0.041) and hyperglycaemia was a significant predictor of one-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 2.39, 95% confidence interval 1.03-5.56). Among patients with hyperglycaemia, 9.8% had developed diabetes at one-year, while the corresponding proportion among patients without hyperglycaemia was 1.8% ( p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, hyperglycaemia at presentation predicted the onset of treated diabetes at one-year (odds ratio 4.15, 95% confidence interval 1.59-10.86; p=0.004).

CONCLUSION

Among non-diabetic patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome, a fasting hyperglycaemia of ⩾10 mmol/l predicted one-year mortality and was associated with a four-fold increased risk of developing diabetes at one year.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Molecular Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 September 2020
Deposited On:21 Jan 2020 13:19
Last Modified:19 Nov 2020 02:06
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:2048-8726
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/2048872618777819
PubMed ID:29862825

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library