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Sleep-EEG in patients with primary aldosteronism in comparison to healthy controls and patients with depression


Engler, Lukas; Heinrich, Daniel A; Adolf, Christian; Riester, Anna; Franke, Anna; Pawlowski, Marcel; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin; Steiger, Axel; Künzel, Heike (2019). Sleep-EEG in patients with primary aldosteronism in comparison to healthy controls and patients with depression. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 112:52-60.

Abstract

The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)/glucocorticoid receptor balance plays an important role in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression. Aldosterone, a primary MR ligand, seems to be related to the pathophysiology of anxiety and depressive symptoms. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of aldosterone excess on sleep EEG, as sleep EEG is a tool to gain insight into psychoneuroendocrine function. Here, 19 untreated patients (9 males, 10 females) suffering from primary aldosteronism were investigated using sleep EEG and several rating scales for anxiety, depression, quality of life and sleep before starting specific treatment. Parameters were compared to age and sex matched healthy controls and patients with depression and correlated with laboratory findings and blood pressure. Patients had higher values for anxiety and depression compared to the general population, although a psychiatric disorder in their history was ruled out. Although sleep disturbances were reported in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index, sleep EEG did not show significant changes between patients and healthy controls. No depression specific pattern in sleep EEG was found. But in contrast to females, several sleep-EEG parameters of male PA patients differed significantly from patients with depression. There was a significant correlation between blood pressure and the severity of depression and anxiety in females. Correlation analysis between blood pressure and rating scales indicate a relationship between blood pressure and anxiety in women. In conclusion, these data suggest gender related effects of aldosterone excess in males and females.

Abstract

The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)/glucocorticoid receptor balance plays an important role in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression. Aldosterone, a primary MR ligand, seems to be related to the pathophysiology of anxiety and depressive symptoms. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of aldosterone excess on sleep EEG, as sleep EEG is a tool to gain insight into psychoneuroendocrine function. Here, 19 untreated patients (9 males, 10 females) suffering from primary aldosteronism were investigated using sleep EEG and several rating scales for anxiety, depression, quality of life and sleep before starting specific treatment. Parameters were compared to age and sex matched healthy controls and patients with depression and correlated with laboratory findings and blood pressure. Patients had higher values for anxiety and depression compared to the general population, although a psychiatric disorder in their history was ruled out. Although sleep disturbances were reported in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index, sleep EEG did not show significant changes between patients and healthy controls. No depression specific pattern in sleep EEG was found. But in contrast to females, several sleep-EEG parameters of male PA patients differed significantly from patients with depression. There was a significant correlation between blood pressure and the severity of depression and anxiety in females. Correlation analysis between blood pressure and rating scales indicate a relationship between blood pressure and anxiety in women. In conclusion, these data suggest gender related effects of aldosterone excess in males and females.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:23 February 2019
Deposited On:21 Mar 2019 15:27
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:30
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3956
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.02.020
PubMed ID:30852427

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