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Good practice in food-related neuroimaging


Smeets, Paul A M; Dagher, Alain; Hare, Todd A; Kullmann, Stephanie; van der Laan, Laura N; Poldrack, Russell A; Preissl, Hubert; Small, Dana; Stice, Eric; Veldhuizen, Maria G (2019). Good practice in food-related neuroimaging. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 109(3):491-503.

Abstract

The use of neuroimaging tools, especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, in nutritional research has increased substantially over the past 2 decades. Neuroimaging is a research tool with great potential impact on the field of nutrition, but to achieve that potential, appropriate use of techniques and interpretation of neuroimaging results is necessary. In this article, we present guidelines for good methodological practice in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies and flag specific limitations in the hope of helping researchers to make the most of neuroimaging tools and avoid potential pitfalls. We highlight specific considerations for food-related studies, such as how to adjust statistically for common confounders, like, for example, hunger state, menstrual phase, and BMI, as well as how to optimally match different types of food stimuli. Finally, we summarize current research needs and future directions, such as the use of prospective designs and more realistic paradigms for studying eating behavior.

Abstract

The use of neuroimaging tools, especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, in nutritional research has increased substantially over the past 2 decades. Neuroimaging is a research tool with great potential impact on the field of nutrition, but to achieve that potential, appropriate use of techniques and interpretation of neuroimaging results is necessary. In this article, we present guidelines for good methodological practice in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies and flag specific limitations in the hope of helping researchers to make the most of neuroimaging tools and avoid potential pitfalls. We highlight specific considerations for food-related studies, such as how to adjust statistically for common confounders, like, for example, hunger state, menstrual phase, and BMI, as well as how to optimally match different types of food stimuli. Finally, we summarize current research needs and future directions, such as the use of prospective designs and more realistic paradigms for studying eating behavior.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Uncontrolled Keywords:Functional magnetic resonance imaging, neuroimaging, good practice, data sharing, food viewing, food choice, taste, aroma, satiationnutrition and dietetics, medicine (miscellaneous)
Language:English
Date:March 2019
Deposited On:19 Mar 2019 14:01
Last Modified:24 Mar 2019 06:51
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0002-9165
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqy344
Official URL:https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/109/3/491/5369498
Project Information:
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID607310
  • : Project TitleNUDGE-IT - The Neurobiology of Decision-Making in Eating - Innovative Tools

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