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Neurofeedback


Holtmann, Martin; Albrecht, Björn; Brandeis, Daniel (2018). Neurofeedback. In: Banaschewski, T; Coghill, D; Zuddas, A. Oxford Textbook of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 366-372.

Abstract

Neurofeedback of specific brain activity patterns allows perceiving and learning to gain control over these otherwise unaware neuronal processes. Neurofeedback may improve underlying neuronal deficits, and/or establish more general self-regulatory skills for compensating behavioural difficulties in other domains. Treating ADHD is the most common clinical neurofeedback application. Standard neurofeedback protocols based on electroencephalography train self-regulation of oscillatory activity in certain frequency bands (targeting theta/beta ratio) or slow cortical potential shifts. Both protocols have demonstrated promising outcomes, particularly in improving inattention symptoms, although controlled effects remain heterogeneous and often attenuated in blinded ratings. Further randomized controlled and (as far as possible) blinded evaluation studies are needed for better understanding of the mode of action and to establish robust standard training protocols for routine care. In the current state of evidence, neurofeedback can be recommended as part of a multimodal treatment of ADHD.

Abstract

Neurofeedback of specific brain activity patterns allows perceiving and learning to gain control over these otherwise unaware neuronal processes. Neurofeedback may improve underlying neuronal deficits, and/or establish more general self-regulatory skills for compensating behavioural difficulties in other domains. Treating ADHD is the most common clinical neurofeedback application. Standard neurofeedback protocols based on electroencephalography train self-regulation of oscillatory activity in certain frequency bands (targeting theta/beta ratio) or slow cortical potential shifts. Both protocols have demonstrated promising outcomes, particularly in improving inattention symptoms, although controlled effects remain heterogeneous and often attenuated in blinded ratings. Further randomized controlled and (as far as possible) blinded evaluation studies are needed for better understanding of the mode of action and to establish robust standard training protocols for routine care. In the current state of evidence, neurofeedback can be recommended as part of a multimodal treatment of ADHD.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 June 2018
Deposited On:22 Mar 2019 08:01
Last Modified:22 Mar 2019 08:01
Publisher:Oxford University Press
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780198739258.003.0039

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