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Clinical findings and treatment of 94 cattle presumptively diagnosed with listeriosis


Schweizer, G; Ehrensperger, F; Torgerson, Paul R; Braun, Ueli (2006). Clinical findings and treatment of 94 cattle presumptively diagnosed with listeriosis. Veterinary Record, 158(17):588-592.

Abstract

The clinical findings and treatment of 94 cattle with listeriosis are described. The general behaviour and condition of the animals were mostly moderately to severely disturbed. A common abnormality in posture was an exaggerated forward or sideward stance, and 11 of the animals were recumbent. More than half of the animals were ataxic and 22 circled. The most frequent cranial neurological signs observed were facial nerve paralysis, salivation, strabismus, reduced or absent pupillary light reflex, reduced or absent tongue movement and head tilt. The haematological and biochemical findings did not contribute to the diagnosis of listeriosis, but they were useful indicators of dehydration and the acid-base status of the animal. Forty-four of 57 of the animals had high leucocyte counts in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), mostly mononuclear cells. Eighty-seven of the animals were treated with various antibiotics (penicillin G, oxytetracycline, amoxicillin, and amoxicillin and gentamicin combined), but there was no significant difference in the success rate of the different treatments. Only two of the nine recumbent animals that were treated survived. Univariable analysis suggested that animals that were recumbent, excited, with an absent or weak menace reflex, nystagmus, high numbers of leucocytes in the CSF, high serum concentrations of urea and calcium and high serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase, and an acid-base deficit, had a smaller chance of surviving. When a logistic regression model was constructed, only recumbency, excitement and a weak or absent menace reflex remained significant factors affecting the likelihood of survival.

Abstract

The clinical findings and treatment of 94 cattle with listeriosis are described. The general behaviour and condition of the animals were mostly moderately to severely disturbed. A common abnormality in posture was an exaggerated forward or sideward stance, and 11 of the animals were recumbent. More than half of the animals were ataxic and 22 circled. The most frequent cranial neurological signs observed were facial nerve paralysis, salivation, strabismus, reduced or absent pupillary light reflex, reduced or absent tongue movement and head tilt. The haematological and biochemical findings did not contribute to the diagnosis of listeriosis, but they were useful indicators of dehydration and the acid-base status of the animal. Forty-four of 57 of the animals had high leucocyte counts in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), mostly mononuclear cells. Eighty-seven of the animals were treated with various antibiotics (penicillin G, oxytetracycline, amoxicillin, and amoxicillin and gentamicin combined), but there was no significant difference in the success rate of the different treatments. Only two of the nine recumbent animals that were treated survived. Univariable analysis suggested that animals that were recumbent, excited, with an absent or weak menace reflex, nystagmus, high numbers of leucocytes in the CSF, high serum concentrations of urea and calcium and high serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase, and an acid-base deficit, had a smaller chance of surviving. When a logistic regression model was constructed, only recumbency, excitement and a weak or absent menace reflex remained significant factors affecting the likelihood of survival.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:29 April 2006
Deposited On:26 Mar 2019 17:48
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:31
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0042-4900
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/vr.158.17.588
PubMed ID:16648439

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