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Estimating the true prevalence of Fasciola hepatica in cattle slaughtered in Switzerland in the absence of an absolute diagnostic test


Rapsch, C; Schweizer, G; Grimm, Felix; Kohler, L; Bauer, C; Deplazes, P; Braun, Ueli; Torgerson, Paul R (2006). Estimating the true prevalence of Fasciola hepatica in cattle slaughtered in Switzerland in the absence of an absolute diagnostic test. International Journal for Parasitology, 36(10-11):1153-1158.

Abstract

A survey of 1,331 cattle presented for slaughter at two abattoirs in Switzerland was used to estimate the true prevalence of Fasciola hepatica infection and the diagnostic parameters of visual meat inspection, coproscopy after sedimentation technique, a commercial ELISA test for specific antibody detection in serum and the post mortem microscopic detection of eggs in bile. Faeces, blood and the gall bladder were taken from most cattle presented for slaughter. In addition, livers that were rejected by the meat inspectors were also dissected to examine for the presence of liver fluke. Bayesian techniques (Markov Chain-Monte Carlo) were used to estimate the diagnostic parameters of each of these procedures and the true prevalence of bovine fasciolosis. The true prevalence of F. hepatica infection was estimated at 18.0% (95% credible intervals 15.9-20.3%). The diagnostic sensitivity of coproscopy, bile examination, antibody ELISA and meat inspection were estimated at 69.0% (57.3-79.7%), 93.4% (88.0-97.5%), 91.7% (87.2-95.2%) and 63.2% (55.6-70.6%), respectively. The diagnostic specificity of the ELISA test was estimated at 93.7% (91.7-95.2%). These results demonstrate that the prevalence of bovine fasciolosis is higher than previously thought due to the low sensitivity of meat inspection. They also demonstrate that traditional coproscopy can be very efficient if there is repeated sampling, resulting in sensitivity of approximately 92%.

Abstract

A survey of 1,331 cattle presented for slaughter at two abattoirs in Switzerland was used to estimate the true prevalence of Fasciola hepatica infection and the diagnostic parameters of visual meat inspection, coproscopy after sedimentation technique, a commercial ELISA test for specific antibody detection in serum and the post mortem microscopic detection of eggs in bile. Faeces, blood and the gall bladder were taken from most cattle presented for slaughter. In addition, livers that were rejected by the meat inspectors were also dissected to examine for the presence of liver fluke. Bayesian techniques (Markov Chain-Monte Carlo) were used to estimate the diagnostic parameters of each of these procedures and the true prevalence of bovine fasciolosis. The true prevalence of F. hepatica infection was estimated at 18.0% (95% credible intervals 15.9-20.3%). The diagnostic sensitivity of coproscopy, bile examination, antibody ELISA and meat inspection were estimated at 69.0% (57.3-79.7%), 93.4% (88.0-97.5%), 91.7% (87.2-95.2%) and 63.2% (55.6-70.6%), respectively. The diagnostic specificity of the ELISA test was estimated at 93.7% (91.7-95.2%). These results demonstrate that the prevalence of bovine fasciolosis is higher than previously thought due to the low sensitivity of meat inspection. They also demonstrate that traditional coproscopy can be very efficient if there is repeated sampling, resulting in sensitivity of approximately 92%.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology

05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Language:English
Date:September 2006
Deposited On:28 Mar 2019 15:31
Last Modified:28 Mar 2019 15:31
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0020-7519
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2006.06.001
PubMed ID:16843470

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