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World Englishes, migration and diaspora


Zipp, Lena (2019). World Englishes, migration and diaspora. In: Schreier, Daniel; Hundt, Marianne; Schneider, Edgar W. The Cambridge Handbook of World Englishes. Cambridge, 120-141.

Abstract

This chapter discusses the relevance of language contact in smaller-scale migration and linguistic diaspora situations for the study of World Englishes (WEs). It provides definitions of the terms diaspora and diasporic language variety and establishes a practice-oriented view of language use that acknowledges the speakers’ linguistic agency in constructing social meaning. It explores intersections of WEs with sociolinguistic identity construction (1) by attempting to bridge the gap between language mixing and WEs research; (2) by problematizing the role of the immigrant generation in the use of ethnolinguistic features; (3) by teasing apart factors on language contact in multiple migration scenarios; and (4) by highlighting the relevance of urban multi-ethnolects for WEs. Contextualizing WEs studies with these different theoretical perspectives pushes the boundaries of the discipline toward foregoing essentialist categories (such as “varieties” or “ethnolects”) in favor of more fluid concepts (such as “processes,” “practices,” or “repertoires”). The chapter thus uses concepts from migration and diaspora studies to show their benefit for future research of WEs.

Abstract

This chapter discusses the relevance of language contact in smaller-scale migration and linguistic diaspora situations for the study of World Englishes (WEs). It provides definitions of the terms diaspora and diasporic language variety and establishes a practice-oriented view of language use that acknowledges the speakers’ linguistic agency in constructing social meaning. It explores intersections of WEs with sociolinguistic identity construction (1) by attempting to bridge the gap between language mixing and WEs research; (2) by problematizing the role of the immigrant generation in the use of ethnolinguistic features; (3) by teasing apart factors on language contact in multiple migration scenarios; and (4) by highlighting the relevance of urban multi-ethnolects for WEs. Contextualizing WEs studies with these different theoretical perspectives pushes the boundaries of the discipline toward foregoing essentialist categories (such as “varieties” or “ethnolects”) in favor of more fluid concepts (such as “processes,” “practices,” or “repertoires”). The chapter thus uses concepts from migration and diaspora studies to show their benefit for future research of WEs.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > English Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:820 English & Old English literatures
Language:English
Date:19 December 2019
Deposited On:04 Nov 2019 09:19
Last Modified:21 Feb 2021 08:09
ISBN:9781108349406
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108349406.006

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