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The relationship between metastatic potential and in vitro mechanical properties of osteosarcoma cells


Holenstein, Claude N; Horvath, Aron; Schär, Barbara; Schoenenberger, Angelina D; Bollhalder, Maja; Goedecke, Nils; Bartalena, Guido; Otto, Oliver; Herbig, Maik; Guck, Jochen; Müller, Daniel A; Snedeker, Jess G; Silvan, Unai (2019). The relationship between metastatic potential and in vitro mechanical properties of osteosarcoma cells. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 30(7):887-898.

Abstract

Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary tumor of bone and is characterized by its high tendency to metastasize in lungs. Although treatment in cases of early diagnosis results in a 5-yr survival rate of nearly 60%, the prognosis for patients with secondary lesions at diagnosis is poor, and their 5-yr survival rate remains below 30%. In the present work, we have used a number of analytical methods to investigate the impact of increased metastatic potential on the biophysical properties and force generation of osteosarcoma cells. With that aim, we used two paired osteosarcoma cell lines, with each one comprising a parental line with low metastatic potential and its experimentally selected, highly metastatic form. Mechanical characterization was performed by means of atomic force microscopy, tensile biaxial deformation, and real-time deformability, and cell traction was measured using two-dimensional and micropost-based traction force microscopy. Our results reveal that the low metastatic osteosarcoma cells display larger spreading sizes and generate higher forces than the experimentally selected, highly malignant variants. In turn, the outcome of cell stiffness measurements strongly depends on the method used and the state of the probed cell, indicating that only a set of phenotyping methods provides the full picture of cell mechanics.

Abstract

Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary tumor of bone and is characterized by its high tendency to metastasize in lungs. Although treatment in cases of early diagnosis results in a 5-yr survival rate of nearly 60%, the prognosis for patients with secondary lesions at diagnosis is poor, and their 5-yr survival rate remains below 30%. In the present work, we have used a number of analytical methods to investigate the impact of increased metastatic potential on the biophysical properties and force generation of osteosarcoma cells. With that aim, we used two paired osteosarcoma cell lines, with each one comprising a parental line with low metastatic potential and its experimentally selected, highly metastatic form. Mechanical characterization was performed by means of atomic force microscopy, tensile biaxial deformation, and real-time deformability, and cell traction was measured using two-dimensional and micropost-based traction force microscopy. Our results reveal that the low metastatic osteosarcoma cells display larger spreading sizes and generate higher forces than the experimentally selected, highly malignant variants. In turn, the outcome of cell stiffness measurements strongly depends on the method used and the state of the probed cell, indicating that only a set of phenotyping methods provides the full picture of cell mechanics.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > Cell Biology
Language:English
Date:21 March 2019
Deposited On:12 Feb 2020 11:42
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 10:32
Publisher:American Society for Cell Biology
ISSN:1059-1524
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1091/mbc.E18-08-0545
PubMed ID:30785850

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