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Simulation and evaluation of 3D traction force microscopy


Holenstein, C N; Lendi, C R; Wili, Nino; Snedeker, J G (2019). Simulation and evaluation of 3D traction force microscopy. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, 22(8):853-860.

Abstract

Measuring cell-generated forces by Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) has become a standard tool in cell mechanobiology. Although widely used in two dimensional (2D) experiments, only a few methods exist to measure traction in three-dimensional (3D) cell culture, since 3D volumetric high-resolution microscopy and more demanding computational approaches are required. Although it is commonly known that the selected experimental and computational setup highly influence the quality and accuracy of the results, no existing methods can adequately assess the errors involved in this process. We present a fully integrated simulation and evaluation platform that allows one to simulate TFM images and quantify errors of an applied approach for traction stress reconstruction, in order to improve experiments that attempt to measure mechanical interaction in cellular systems. In this context, we show that a careful parameter selection can decrease the reconstructed traction error by up to 40%.

Abstract

Measuring cell-generated forces by Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) has become a standard tool in cell mechanobiology. Although widely used in two dimensional (2D) experiments, only a few methods exist to measure traction in three-dimensional (3D) cell culture, since 3D volumetric high-resolution microscopy and more demanding computational approaches are required. Although it is commonly known that the selected experimental and computational setup highly influence the quality and accuracy of the results, no existing methods can adequately assess the errors involved in this process. We present a fully integrated simulation and evaluation platform that allows one to simulate TFM images and quantify errors of an applied approach for traction stress reconstruction, in order to improve experiments that attempt to measure mechanical interaction in cellular systems. In this context, we show that a careful parameter selection can decrease the reconstructed traction error by up to 40%.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Bioengineering
Physical Sciences > Biomedical Engineering
Physical Sciences > Human-Computer Interaction
Physical Sciences > Computer Science Applications
Language:English
Date:9 April 2019
Deposited On:12 Feb 2020 12:55
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 10:38
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1025-5842
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/10255842.2019.1599866
PubMed ID:30963777

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