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Chondrichthyan teeth from the Early Triassic Paris Biota (Bear Lake County, Idaho, USA)


Romano, Carlo; Argyriou, Thodoris; Krumenacker, L J (2019). Chondrichthyan teeth from the Early Triassic Paris Biota (Bear Lake County, Idaho, USA). Geobios, 54:63-70.

Abstract

A new, diverse and complex Early Triassic assemblage was recently discovered west of the town of Paris, Idaho (Bear Lake County), USA. This assemblage has been coined the Paris Biota. Dated earliest Spathian (i.e., early late Olenekian), the Paris Biota provides further evidence that the biotic recovery from the end-Permian mass extinction was well underway ca. 1.3 million years after the event. This assemblage includes mainly invertebrates, but also vertebrate remains such as ichthyoliths (isolated skeletal remains of fishes). Here we describe first fossils of Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) from the Paris Biota. The material is composed of isolated teeth (mostly grinding teeth) preserved on two slabs and representing two distinct taxa. Due to incomplete preservation and morphological differences to known taxa, the chondrichthyans from the Paris Biota are provisionally kept in open nomenclature, as Hybodontiformes gen. et sp. indet. A and Hybodontiformes gen. et sp. indet. B, respectively. The present study adds a new occurrence to the chondrichthyan fossil record of the marine Early Triassic western USA Basin, from where other isolated teeth (Omanoselache, other Hybodontiformes) as well as fin spines of Nemacanthus (Neoselachii) and Pyknotylacanthus (Ctenachanthoidea) and denticles have been described previously.

Abstract

A new, diverse and complex Early Triassic assemblage was recently discovered west of the town of Paris, Idaho (Bear Lake County), USA. This assemblage has been coined the Paris Biota. Dated earliest Spathian (i.e., early late Olenekian), the Paris Biota provides further evidence that the biotic recovery from the end-Permian mass extinction was well underway ca. 1.3 million years after the event. This assemblage includes mainly invertebrates, but also vertebrate remains such as ichthyoliths (isolated skeletal remains of fishes). Here we describe first fossils of Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) from the Paris Biota. The material is composed of isolated teeth (mostly grinding teeth) preserved on two slabs and representing two distinct taxa. Due to incomplete preservation and morphological differences to known taxa, the chondrichthyans from the Paris Biota are provisionally kept in open nomenclature, as Hybodontiformes gen. et sp. indet. A and Hybodontiformes gen. et sp. indet. B, respectively. The present study adds a new occurrence to the chondrichthyan fossil record of the marine Early Triassic western USA Basin, from where other isolated teeth (Omanoselache, other Hybodontiformes) as well as fin spines of Nemacanthus (Neoselachii) and Pyknotylacanthus (Ctenachanthoidea) and denticles have been described previously.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Stratigraphy
Physical Sciences > Space and Planetary Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Stratigraphy, Space and Planetary Science
Language:English
Date:1 June 2019
Deposited On:16 May 2019 09:56
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 10:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0016-6995
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geobios.2019.04.001

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