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Reverse shoulder arthroplasty in the treatment of glenohumeral instability


Hasler, Anita; Fornaciari, Paolo; Jungwirth-Weinberger, Anna; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Wieser, Karl; Gerber, Christian (2019). Reverse shoulder arthroplasty in the treatment of glenohumeral instability. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 28(8):1587-1594.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Glenohumeral instability is a rare indication for primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), accounting for fewer than 1% of the indications in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and radiographic outcomes of RTSA for recurrent instability after failed operative repair or instability associated with major bone loss in elderly patients.
METHODS
A retrospective matched case-control study was performed. We compared 11 shoulders treated with RTSA for instability (cases) with 22 matched shoulders treated with RTSA for rotator cuff insufficiency (controls). Clinical and radiographic outcomes were compared.
RESULTS
The median follow-up period was 74 months (interquartile range [IQR], 18 months; range, 22-171 months) in cases and 70 months (IQR, 13 months; range, 23-172 months) in controls. The median age was 74 years (IQR, 18 years) in the case group and 70 years (IQR, 13 years) in the control group. No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in satisfaction scores, preoperative and postoperative absolute and relative Constant scores, and complication rates. Active range of motion tended to be superior in the controls for mean flexion (130° vs. 110°, P = .15), abduction (143° vs. 100°, P = .16), and external rotation (28° vs. 20°, P = .86) without the differences reaching statistical significance, possibly because of the small sample size. Postoperative dislocation was not recorded in cases or controls, but subjective insecurity regarding stability was reported once in each group.
CONCLUSION
RTSA seems to represent a valuable treatment option for glenohumeral instability in an elderly population with large bone loss or as a salvage procedure after failed operative glenohumeral stabilization. Postoperative instability was not observed in the case and control groups.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Glenohumeral instability is a rare indication for primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), accounting for fewer than 1% of the indications in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and radiographic outcomes of RTSA for recurrent instability after failed operative repair or instability associated with major bone loss in elderly patients.
METHODS
A retrospective matched case-control study was performed. We compared 11 shoulders treated with RTSA for instability (cases) with 22 matched shoulders treated with RTSA for rotator cuff insufficiency (controls). Clinical and radiographic outcomes were compared.
RESULTS
The median follow-up period was 74 months (interquartile range [IQR], 18 months; range, 22-171 months) in cases and 70 months (IQR, 13 months; range, 23-172 months) in controls. The median age was 74 years (IQR, 18 years) in the case group and 70 years (IQR, 13 years) in the control group. No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in satisfaction scores, preoperative and postoperative absolute and relative Constant scores, and complication rates. Active range of motion tended to be superior in the controls for mean flexion (130° vs. 110°, P = .15), abduction (143° vs. 100°, P = .16), and external rotation (28° vs. 20°, P = .86) without the differences reaching statistical significance, possibly because of the small sample size. Postoperative dislocation was not recorded in cases or controls, but subjective insecurity regarding stability was reported once in each group.
CONCLUSION
RTSA seems to represent a valuable treatment option for glenohumeral instability in an elderly population with large bone loss or as a salvage procedure after failed operative glenohumeral stabilization. Postoperative instability was not observed in the case and control groups.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Language:English
Date:15 April 2019
Deposited On:12 Feb 2020 12:58
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 10:43
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1058-2746
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2019.02.001
PubMed ID:31000425

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