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Incidence, severity and pattern of burns in children and adolescents: An epidemiological study among immigrant and Swiss patients in Switzerland


Elrod, Julia; Schiestl, Clemens M; Mohr, Christoph; Landolt, Markus A (2019). Incidence, severity and pattern of burns in children and adolescents: An epidemiological study among immigrant and Swiss patients in Switzerland. Burns, 45(5):1231-1241.

Abstract

Background: Despite advances in surgical management and critical care for burn surgery, morbidity and mortality of patients with severe burns remains high. Especially in the pediatric population, burns often lead to devastating consequences such as the necessity of corrective surgery until adulthood. Worldwide, 80%–90% of all severe burns occur in low to middle income countries. But also in high income countries, burns are distributed inequitably. Risk factors include age, sex, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity.

Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the typical demographics and injury-related data of pediatric burn patients in order to contribute to preventive measures. Special interest was paid to the question of whether the incidence of severe burns is higher among patients with an immigration background.

Patients and methods: Patient records of the 4373 patients admitted to the Pediatric Burn Unit of the University Children’s Hospital of Zurich from 2006 to 2018 were analyzed. Demographic data and injury patterns are presented descriptively. Temporal trends concerning duration of hospitalization and setting (inpatient versus outpatient), differences in relative incidence and in burn mechanism in distinct cohorts (by nation and Human Development Index (HDI)) and seasonal trends were analyzed. Furthermore, risk factors for large burns and for (prolonged) inpatient treatment were examined using a multivariate approach.

Results: Temporal resolution shows considerable variation between inpatient and outpatient treatment (p > 0.001) and with shorter hospital stays (p = 0.004). Swiss citizens and patients with an immigration background from very highly developed countries sustain a significantly lower incidence of heat-related injuries than all others (p < 0.001). The most common burn causes among all children, independent of their country of citizenship, are related to kitchen items or hot tea and coffee (35.57% ± 4.01% resp. 32.39% ± 5.95%). Logistic regression revealed that migration background from a low HDI country is significantly associated with larger burns (>5% TBSA) and with a need for inpatient treatment.

Conclusion: The study emphasizes the need for highly specific measures of burn prevention and indicates the necessity of focusing on certain target groups who are especially vulnerable to burns, such as immigrants from less developed countries.

Abstract

Background: Despite advances in surgical management and critical care for burn surgery, morbidity and mortality of patients with severe burns remains high. Especially in the pediatric population, burns often lead to devastating consequences such as the necessity of corrective surgery until adulthood. Worldwide, 80%–90% of all severe burns occur in low to middle income countries. But also in high income countries, burns are distributed inequitably. Risk factors include age, sex, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity.

Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the typical demographics and injury-related data of pediatric burn patients in order to contribute to preventive measures. Special interest was paid to the question of whether the incidence of severe burns is higher among patients with an immigration background.

Patients and methods: Patient records of the 4373 patients admitted to the Pediatric Burn Unit of the University Children’s Hospital of Zurich from 2006 to 2018 were analyzed. Demographic data and injury patterns are presented descriptively. Temporal trends concerning duration of hospitalization and setting (inpatient versus outpatient), differences in relative incidence and in burn mechanism in distinct cohorts (by nation and Human Development Index (HDI)) and seasonal trends were analyzed. Furthermore, risk factors for large burns and for (prolonged) inpatient treatment were examined using a multivariate approach.

Results: Temporal resolution shows considerable variation between inpatient and outpatient treatment (p > 0.001) and with shorter hospital stays (p = 0.004). Swiss citizens and patients with an immigration background from very highly developed countries sustain a significantly lower incidence of heat-related injuries than all others (p < 0.001). The most common burn causes among all children, independent of their country of citizenship, are related to kitchen items or hot tea and coffee (35.57% ± 4.01% resp. 32.39% ± 5.95%). Logistic regression revealed that migration background from a low HDI country is significantly associated with larger burns (>5% TBSA) and with a need for inpatient treatment.

Conclusion: The study emphasizes the need for highly specific measures of burn prevention and indicates the necessity of focusing on certain target groups who are especially vulnerable to burns, such as immigrants from less developed countries.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Surgery, Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine, Emergency Medicine, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 August 2019
Deposited On:14 May 2019 11:11
Last Modified:12 Jun 2019 01:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0305-4179
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2019.02.009

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