Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Retention of solutes and particles in the gastrointestinal tract of a grazing cervid: Père David’s deer (Elaphurus davidianus)


Derix, Jill; Ortmann, Sylvia; Wiegmann, Lisa; Lawrenz, Arne; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Clauss, Marcus (2019). Retention of solutes and particles in the gastrointestinal tract of a grazing cervid: Père David’s deer (Elaphurus davidianus). European Journal of Wildlife Research, 65(3):46.

Abstract

Ruminants are classified into three groups, according to their feeding behaviour: browsers, intermediate feeders and grazers. Corresponding to their dietary preferences, multiple morphological and physiological adaptations have been described, resulting in another classification: ‘moose-type’ and ‘cattle-type’ ruminants. Digesta retention patterns in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and reticulorumen (RR) are considered major criteria to distinguish these types, as cattle-type ruminants show shorter retention of fluids (measured by a solute marker) than of particles, while in moose-type ruminants, both are retained for more similar periods. To what extent these digestive types are specific to phylogenetic lineages is still unclear. We measured mean retention times (MRTs) of solutes and particles (2 and 20mm) in the strictest grazing cervid: the Père David’s deer (Elaphurus davidianus; n = 5; body mass = 155.0 ± 14.5 kg). The MRTs of solutes, small and large particles in the GIT were 34 ± 4, 60 ± 7 and 69 ± 9 h, respectively. The ratio of the MRTof small particles versus solutes in the RR was 2.0 ± 0.1, similar to other cattle-type ruminants. The results confirm the hypothesis that Père David’s deer can be classified as cattle-type ruminants, corresponding to both dietary preferences and previously described morphological traits. The results complement previous findings, showing that both cattletype and moose-type physiologies are found among bovids as well as cervids, indicating that these digestion types can be considered convergent adaptations.

Abstract

Ruminants are classified into three groups, according to their feeding behaviour: browsers, intermediate feeders and grazers. Corresponding to their dietary preferences, multiple morphological and physiological adaptations have been described, resulting in another classification: ‘moose-type’ and ‘cattle-type’ ruminants. Digesta retention patterns in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and reticulorumen (RR) are considered major criteria to distinguish these types, as cattle-type ruminants show shorter retention of fluids (measured by a solute marker) than of particles, while in moose-type ruminants, both are retained for more similar periods. To what extent these digestive types are specific to phylogenetic lineages is still unclear. We measured mean retention times (MRTs) of solutes and particles (2 and 20mm) in the strictest grazing cervid: the Père David’s deer (Elaphurus davidianus; n = 5; body mass = 155.0 ± 14.5 kg). The MRTs of solutes, small and large particles in the GIT were 34 ± 4, 60 ± 7 and 69 ± 9 h, respectively. The ratio of the MRTof small particles versus solutes in the RR was 2.0 ± 0.1, similar to other cattle-type ruminants. The results confirm the hypothesis that Père David’s deer can be classified as cattle-type ruminants, corresponding to both dietary preferences and previously described morphological traits. The results complement previous findings, showing that both cattletype and moose-type physiologies are found among bovids as well as cervids, indicating that these digestion types can be considered convergent adaptations.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 05 Jun 2019
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ecology, Animal Science and Zoology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law, Nature and Landscape Conservation
Language:English
Date:1 June 2019
Deposited On:05 Jun 2019 14:53
Last Modified:17 Sep 2019 20:23
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1439-0574
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10344-019-1288-0

Download