Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Changing dimensions of cultural consumption? Social space and space of lifestyles in Switzerland from 1976 to 2013


Weingartner, Sebastian; Rössel, Jörg (2019). Changing dimensions of cultural consumption? Social space and space of lifestyles in Switzerland from 1976 to 2013. Poetics, 74:101345.

Abstract

In the present study we trace transformations of the Swiss space of lifestyles during the past four decades. The sociological discussion suggests that lifestyle practices were once structured by a highbrow-lowbrow distinction, whereas today cultural omnivorism, eclecticism, broad engagement, or cosmopolitanism should be prevalent. Furthermore, Bourdieu’s homology thesis claims that cultural consumption is closely linked with class structures, which is contested by recent individualisation arguments. So, we ask two questions here: First, what are the main axes of the Swiss space of lifestyles and how do they develop over time? Second, how does the association between the space of lifestyles and the space of social positions evolve over time? We find that cultural practices in Switzerland are primarily structured by a dimension differentiating between engagement in a wide range of activities and disengagement, followed, secondly, by a highbrow-popular distinction. Accordingly, we identify an “inactive”, an “intense highbrow” and a “moderate eclectic” consumption pattern. Although this configuration is quite stable over time, structural correlates of lifestyles are changing. Most importantly, indicators of vertical social position like education or occupational status are correlated with broad cultural engagement today, whereas they have been correlated with highbrow activities in the 1970s. Instead, age emerged as the main structuring factor of highbrow-popular disparities.

Abstract

In the present study we trace transformations of the Swiss space of lifestyles during the past four decades. The sociological discussion suggests that lifestyle practices were once structured by a highbrow-lowbrow distinction, whereas today cultural omnivorism, eclecticism, broad engagement, or cosmopolitanism should be prevalent. Furthermore, Bourdieu’s homology thesis claims that cultural consumption is closely linked with class structures, which is contested by recent individualisation arguments. So, we ask two questions here: First, what are the main axes of the Swiss space of lifestyles and how do they develop over time? Second, how does the association between the space of lifestyles and the space of social positions evolve over time? We find that cultural practices in Switzerland are primarily structured by a dimension differentiating between engagement in a wide range of activities and disengagement, followed, secondly, by a highbrow-popular distinction. Accordingly, we identify an “inactive”, an “intense highbrow” and a “moderate eclectic” consumption pattern. Although this configuration is quite stable over time, structural correlates of lifestyles are changing. Most importantly, indicators of vertical social position like education or occupational status are correlated with broad cultural engagement today, whereas they have been correlated with highbrow activities in the 1970s. Instead, age emerged as the main structuring factor of highbrow-popular disparities.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 17 Jun 2019
2 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:1 June 2019
Deposited On:17 Jun 2019 09:21
Last Modified:21 Jun 2019 01:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0304-422X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.poetic.2019.01.001

Download