Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Immunotherapy for neurodegeneration?


Liu, Yingjun; Aguzzi, Adriano (2019). Immunotherapy for neurodegeneration? Science, 364(6436):130-131.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease attack different parts of the central nervous system (CNS) and elicit distinct symptoms, yet they share many biochemical and neuropathological features. These include the formation of protein aggregates in the affected brain regions and progressive activation of non-neuronal cells in the brain that play crucial roles in immune responses. The activation of immune cells in the CNS (“neuroinflammation”) is prominent in these diseases. However, it remains unclear whether boosting or suppressing the immune system, in the brain or in the periphery, may attenuate neurodegeneration. In the case of extraneural prion infections, genetic or pharmacological ablation of components of the immune system, such as B cells and complement, can prevent disease (1). However, immunotherapies, which have been successful in treating certain types of cancer, have yet to reverse neurodegeneration in any patients. Therefore, the therapeutic promise of this approach remains debatable.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease attack different parts of the central nervous system (CNS) and elicit distinct symptoms, yet they share many biochemical and neuropathological features. These include the formation of protein aggregates in the affected brain regions and progressive activation of non-neuronal cells in the brain that play crucial roles in immune responses. The activation of immune cells in the CNS (“neuroinflammation”) is prominent in these diseases. However, it remains unclear whether boosting or suppressing the immune system, in the brain or in the periphery, may attenuate neurodegeneration. In the case of extraneural prion infections, genetic or pharmacological ablation of components of the immune system, such as B cells and complement, can prevent disease (1). However, immunotherapies, which have been successful in treating certain types of cancer, have yet to reverse neurodegeneration in any patients. Therefore, the therapeutic promise of this approach remains debatable.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
8 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

6 downloads since deposited on 04 Jun 2019
2 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:12 April 2019
Deposited On:04 Jun 2019 13:36
Last Modified:05 May 2020 15:00
Publisher:American Association for the Advancement of Science
ISSN:0036-8075
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaw0685
Related URLs:https://science.sciencemag.org/content/364/6436/130.long (Publisher)
PubMed ID:30975878
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID179040
  • : Project TitleThe prion protein in health and disease
  • : FunderH2020
  • : Grant ID670958
  • : Project TitleFunction and malfunction of the prion protein
  • : FunderNomis Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project TitleExploring the locales of cognitive decline: cellular and molecular 3D atlases of brain patholo-gy in aging and in neurodegenerative disease

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members

Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 251kB
View at publisher
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 1 May 2021
Size: 1MB
Embargo till: 2021-05-01