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Sex differences in pacing during half-marathon and marathon race


Cuk, Ivan; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Knechtle, Beat (2019). Sex differences in pacing during half-marathon and marathon race. Research in Sports Medicine:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

The main aim of the present study was to examine differences in pacing between half-marathon and marathon in men and women. A total of 17,525 finishers in the marathon (n = 4807 men; n = 1278 women) and half-marathon race (n = 7624 men; n = 3816 women) in Vienna 2017 were considered. Their pacing was assessed through five race segments (0-23.7%, 23.7-47.4%, 47.4-71.1%, 71.1-94.8% and 94.8-100%) of the race. Compared to marathon (where absolute average change of speed [ACS] was 5.46% and 4.12% in men and women, respectively), a more even pacing was observed in half-marathon in both sexes (ACS = 3.60% and 3.36% in men and women, respectively). The more even pacing in women previously observed in marathon races was verified in half-marathon, too. However, the sex difference in pacing was smaller in half-marathon than in marathon. Since men and women endurance runners participate in both races, sport practitioners would have great benefit from these results since they could establish sex-based personalized race strategies and training programmes.

Abstract

The main aim of the present study was to examine differences in pacing between half-marathon and marathon in men and women. A total of 17,525 finishers in the marathon (n = 4807 men; n = 1278 women) and half-marathon race (n = 7624 men; n = 3816 women) in Vienna 2017 were considered. Their pacing was assessed through five race segments (0-23.7%, 23.7-47.4%, 47.4-71.1%, 71.1-94.8% and 94.8-100%) of the race. Compared to marathon (where absolute average change of speed [ACS] was 5.46% and 4.12% in men and women, respectively), a more even pacing was observed in half-marathon in both sexes (ACS = 3.60% and 3.36% in men and women, respectively). The more even pacing in women previously observed in marathon races was verified in half-marathon, too. However, the sex difference in pacing was smaller in half-marathon than in marathon. Since men and women endurance runners participate in both races, sport practitioners would have great benefit from these results since they could establish sex-based personalized race strategies and training programmes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:21 March 2019
Deposited On:12 Jun 2019 13:49
Last Modified:30 Jun 2019 05:58
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1543-8627
Additional Information:This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Research in Sports Medicine on2019, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/15438627.2019.1593835
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/15438627.2019.1593835
PubMed ID:30897961

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