Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Nonhematopoietic cells are key players in innate control of bacterial airway infection


LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé; Weidner, Kerstin; Hilbi, Hubert; Oxenius, Annette (2011). Nonhematopoietic cells are key players in innate control of bacterial airway infection. Journal of Immunology, 186(5):3130-3137.

Abstract

Airborne pathogens encounter several hurdles during host invasion, including alveolar macrophages (AMs) and airway epithelial cells (AECs) and their products. Although growing evidence indicates pathogen-sensing capacities of epithelial cells, the relative contribution of hematopoietic versus nonhematopoietic cells in the induction of an inflammatory response and their possible interplay is still poorly defined in vivo in the context of infections with pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we show that nonhematopoietic cells, including AECs, are critical players in the inflammatory process induced upon airway infection with Legionella pneumophila, and that they are essential for control of bacterial infections. Lung parenchymal cells, including AECs, are not infected themselves by L. pneumophila in vivo but rather act as sensors and amplifiers of inflammatory cues delivered by L. pneumophila-infected AM. We identified AM-derived IL-1β as the critical mediator to induce chemokine production in nonhematopoietic cells in the lung, resulting in swift and robust recruitment of infection-controlling neutrophils into the airways. These data add a new level of complexity to the coordination of the innate immune response to L. pneumophila and illustrate how the cross talk between leukocytes and nonhematopoietic cells contributes to efficient host protection.

Abstract

Airborne pathogens encounter several hurdles during host invasion, including alveolar macrophages (AMs) and airway epithelial cells (AECs) and their products. Although growing evidence indicates pathogen-sensing capacities of epithelial cells, the relative contribution of hematopoietic versus nonhematopoietic cells in the induction of an inflammatory response and their possible interplay is still poorly defined in vivo in the context of infections with pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we show that nonhematopoietic cells, including AECs, are critical players in the inflammatory process induced upon airway infection with Legionella pneumophila, and that they are essential for control of bacterial infections. Lung parenchymal cells, including AECs, are not infected themselves by L. pneumophila in vivo but rather act as sensors and amplifiers of inflammatory cues delivered by L. pneumophila-infected AM. We identified AM-derived IL-1β as the critical mediator to induce chemokine production in nonhematopoietic cells in the lung, resulting in swift and robust recruitment of infection-controlling neutrophils into the airways. These data add a new level of complexity to the coordination of the innate immune response to L. pneumophila and illustrate how the cross talk between leukocytes and nonhematopoietic cells contributes to efficient host protection.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
34 citations in Web of Science®
36 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 26 Jun 2019
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Immunology and Allergy
Life Sciences > Immunology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Immunology
Language:English
Date:1 March 2011
Deposited On:26 Jun 2019 09:45
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 03:27
Publisher:American Association of Immunologists
ISSN:0022-1767
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1003565
PubMed ID:21270399

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members