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Are Pre-hospital Trauma Deaths Preventable? A Systematic Literature Review


Pfeifer, Roman; Halvachizadeh, Sascha; Schick, Sylvia; Sprengel, Kai; Jensen, Kai Oliver; Teuben, Michel; Mica, Ladislav; Neuhaus, Valentin; Pape, Hans-Christoph (2019). Are Pre-hospital Trauma Deaths Preventable? A Systematic Literature Review. World Journal of Surgery, 43(10):2438-2446.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The first and largest peak of trauma mortality is encountered on the trauma site. The aim of this study was to determine whether these trauma-related deaths are preventable. We performed a systematic literature review with a focus on pre-hospital preventable deaths in severely injured patients and their causes.
METHODS Studies published in a peer-reviewed journal between January 1, 1990 and January 10, 2018 were included. Parameters of interest: country of publication, number of patients included, preventable death rate (PP = potentially preventable and DP = definitely preventable), inclusion criteria within studies (pre-hospital only, pre-hospital and hospital deaths), definition of preventability used in each study, type of trauma (blunt versus penetrating), study design (prospective versus retrospective) and causes for preventability mentioned within the study.
RESULTS After a systematic literature search, 19 papers (total 7235 death) were included in this literature review. The majority (63.1%) of studies used autopsies combined with an expert panel to assess the preventability of death in the patients. Pre-hospital death rates range from 14.6 to 47.6%, in which 4.9-11.3% were definitely preventable and 25.8-42.7% were potentially preventable. The most common (27-58%) reason was a delayed treatment of the trauma victims, followed by management (40-60%) and treatment errors (50-76.6%).
CONCLUSION According to our systematic review, a relevant amount of the observed mortality was described as preventable due to delays in treatment and management/treatment errors. Standards in the pre-hospital trauma system and management should be discussed in order to find strategies to reduce mortality.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The first and largest peak of trauma mortality is encountered on the trauma site. The aim of this study was to determine whether these trauma-related deaths are preventable. We performed a systematic literature review with a focus on pre-hospital preventable deaths in severely injured patients and their causes.
METHODS Studies published in a peer-reviewed journal between January 1, 1990 and January 10, 2018 were included. Parameters of interest: country of publication, number of patients included, preventable death rate (PP = potentially preventable and DP = definitely preventable), inclusion criteria within studies (pre-hospital only, pre-hospital and hospital deaths), definition of preventability used in each study, type of trauma (blunt versus penetrating), study design (prospective versus retrospective) and causes for preventability mentioned within the study.
RESULTS After a systematic literature search, 19 papers (total 7235 death) were included in this literature review. The majority (63.1%) of studies used autopsies combined with an expert panel to assess the preventability of death in the patients. Pre-hospital death rates range from 14.6 to 47.6%, in which 4.9-11.3% were definitely preventable and 25.8-42.7% were potentially preventable. The most common (27-58%) reason was a delayed treatment of the trauma victims, followed by management (40-60%) and treatment errors (50-76.6%).
CONCLUSION According to our systematic review, a relevant amount of the observed mortality was described as preventable due to delays in treatment and management/treatment errors. Standards in the pre-hospital trauma system and management should be discussed in order to find strategies to reduce mortality.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Department of Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 October 2019
Deposited On:25 Jun 2019 12:27
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:36
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0364-2313
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00268-019-05056-1
PubMed ID:31214829

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