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Olive Leaf Extract Attenuates Inflammatory Activation and DNA Damage in Human Arterial Endothelial Cells


Burja, Blaž; Kuret, Tadeja; Janko, Tea; Topalović, Dijana; Živković, Lada; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Žigon, Polona; Distler, Oliver; Čučnik, Saša; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Lakota, Katja; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca (2019). Olive Leaf Extract Attenuates Inflammatory Activation and DNA Damage in Human Arterial Endothelial Cells. Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine, 6:56.

Abstract

Olive leaf extract (OLE) is used in traditional medicine as a food supplement and as an over-the-counter drug for a variety of its effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic ones. Mechanisms through which OLE could modulate these pathways in human vasculature remain largely unknown. Serum amyloid A (SAA) plays a causal role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases and induces pro-inflammatory and pro-adhesive responses in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Within this study we explored whether OLE can attenuate SAA-driven responses in HCAEC. HCAEC were treated with SAA (1,000 nM) and/or OLE (0.5 and 1 mg/ml). The expression of adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and E-selectin, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2 and MMP9) and microRNA 146a, let-7e, and let-7g (involved in the regulation of inflammation) was determined by qPCR. The amount of secreted IL-6, IL-8, MIF, and GRO-α in cell culture supernatants was quantified by ELISA. Phosphorylation of NF-κB was assessed by Western blot and DNA damage was measured using the COMET assay. OLE decreased significantly released protein levels of IL-6 and IL-8, as well as mRNA expression of E-selectin in SAA-stimulated HCAEC and reduced MMP2 levels in unstimulated cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB (p65) was upregulated in the presence of SAA, with OLE significantly attenuating this SAA-induced effect. OLE stabilized SAA-induced upregulation of microRNA-146a and let-7e in HCAEC, suggesting that OLE could fine-tune the SAA-driven activity of NF-κB by changing the microRNA networks in HCAEC. SAA induced DNA damage and worsened the oxidative DNA damage in HCAEC, whereas OLE protected HCAEC from SAA- and HO-driven DNA damage. OLE significantly attenuated certain pro-inflammatory and pro-adhesive responses and decreased DNA damage in HCAEC upon stimulation with SAA. The reversal of SAA-driven endothelial activation by OLE might contribute to its anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic effects in HCAEC.

Abstract

Olive leaf extract (OLE) is used in traditional medicine as a food supplement and as an over-the-counter drug for a variety of its effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic ones. Mechanisms through which OLE could modulate these pathways in human vasculature remain largely unknown. Serum amyloid A (SAA) plays a causal role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases and induces pro-inflammatory and pro-adhesive responses in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Within this study we explored whether OLE can attenuate SAA-driven responses in HCAEC. HCAEC were treated with SAA (1,000 nM) and/or OLE (0.5 and 1 mg/ml). The expression of adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and E-selectin, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2 and MMP9) and microRNA 146a, let-7e, and let-7g (involved in the regulation of inflammation) was determined by qPCR. The amount of secreted IL-6, IL-8, MIF, and GRO-α in cell culture supernatants was quantified by ELISA. Phosphorylation of NF-κB was assessed by Western blot and DNA damage was measured using the COMET assay. OLE decreased significantly released protein levels of IL-6 and IL-8, as well as mRNA expression of E-selectin in SAA-stimulated HCAEC and reduced MMP2 levels in unstimulated cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB (p65) was upregulated in the presence of SAA, with OLE significantly attenuating this SAA-induced effect. OLE stabilized SAA-induced upregulation of microRNA-146a and let-7e in HCAEC, suggesting that OLE could fine-tune the SAA-driven activity of NF-κB by changing the microRNA networks in HCAEC. SAA induced DNA damage and worsened the oxidative DNA damage in HCAEC, whereas OLE protected HCAEC from SAA- and HO-driven DNA damage. OLE significantly attenuated certain pro-inflammatory and pro-adhesive responses and decreased DNA damage in HCAEC upon stimulation with SAA. The reversal of SAA-driven endothelial activation by OLE might contribute to its anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic effects in HCAEC.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2019
Deposited On:26 Jun 2019 11:57
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:36
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:2297-055X
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fcvm.2019.00056
PubMed ID:31157238

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