Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Moving Forward in Fostering Humour: Towards Training Lighter Forms of Humour in Multicultural Contexts


Hofmann, Jennifer; Ruch, Willibald (2019). Moving Forward in Fostering Humour: Towards Training Lighter Forms of Humour in Multicultural Contexts. In: Van Zyl, Llewellyn Ellardus; Rothmann Sr, Sebastiaan. Theoretical Approaches to Multi-Cultural Positive Psychological Interventions. Cham: Springer, 1-20.

Abstract

The following theoretical position paper has the aim to outline two important future directions of humour intervention research. Firstly, existing humour trainings have not differentiated explicitly between different uses of humour or humour that may be virtuous or not. Within the realm of Positive Psychology, all virtuous forms of humour need to be identified and interventions developed that aim at fostering these benevolent/lighter forms. Secondly, most humour trainings have been adapted and conducted in one cultural context. Future trainings should consider cross-cultural perspectives to allow for comparative research and practice. Thus, the current paper first gives an overview on the extant literature on the distinction between lighter and darker forms of humour, as well as showing how humour can serve the virtues proposed by Peterson and Seligman (2004). Then, we elaborate on the findings on humour and well-being, as well as findings on existing humour interventions. The second section starts with open questions and hypotheses on how a new generation of trainings targeting lighter forms of humour could look like. Then, we discuss (potential) cultural differences in humour and how this may affect the design of interventions. When aiming for cross-cultural adaptations of the same humour program, several challenges have to be overcome, such as the term “humour” not having the same meaning in every culture, and cultural rules on what can be laughed at.

Abstract

The following theoretical position paper has the aim to outline two important future directions of humour intervention research. Firstly, existing humour trainings have not differentiated explicitly between different uses of humour or humour that may be virtuous or not. Within the realm of Positive Psychology, all virtuous forms of humour need to be identified and interventions developed that aim at fostering these benevolent/lighter forms. Secondly, most humour trainings have been adapted and conducted in one cultural context. Future trainings should consider cross-cultural perspectives to allow for comparative research and practice. Thus, the current paper first gives an overview on the extant literature on the distinction between lighter and darker forms of humour, as well as showing how humour can serve the virtues proposed by Peterson and Seligman (2004). Then, we elaborate on the findings on humour and well-being, as well as findings on existing humour interventions. The second section starts with open questions and hypotheses on how a new generation of trainings targeting lighter forms of humour could look like. Then, we discuss (potential) cultural differences in humour and how this may affect the design of interventions. When aiming for cross-cultural adaptations of the same humour program, several challenges have to be overcome, such as the term “humour” not having the same meaning in every culture, and cultural rules on what can be laughed at.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

98 downloads since deposited on 26 Jun 2019
84 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 January 2019
Deposited On:26 Jun 2019 12:54
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:37
Publisher:Springer
ISBN:9783030205829
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20583-6_1

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Moving Forward in Fostering Humour: Towards Training Lighter Forms of Humour in Multicultural Contexts'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 462kB
View at publisher
Get full-text in a library