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Cognitive outcome of early school-aged children born very preterm is not predicted by early short-term amplitude-integrated electroencephalography


Feldmann, Maria; Rousson, Valentin; Nguyen, Thi Dao; Bernet, Vera; Hagmann, Cornelia; Latal, Beatrice; Natalucci, Giancarlo (2020). Cognitive outcome of early school-aged children born very preterm is not predicted by early short-term amplitude-integrated electroencephalography. Acta Paediatrica, 109(1):78-84.

Abstract

AIM

We investigated the association between early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) and cognitive outcome in very preterm infants at early school-age.

METHODS

This prospective cohort study, conducted in the Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland, from 2009-2012, comprised infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestation, who underwent continuous aEEG recording during the first four days of life. Cognitive outcome was assessed with the Kaufman-Assessment Battery for Children at five years. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were calculated between aEEG parameters and normal cognitive outcome, defined as an intelligence quotient (IQ) of at least 85.

RESULTS

The 118 (52.5% male) infants were born at a mean gestational age of 29.9 weeks and a mean birth weight of 1,235 ±363 grams. We followed up 89 children at the age of five and they had a mean IQ of 97.8 ±12.7 with 21.3% under 85 - and 2.2% had cerebral palsy. Univariate analyses found associations between aEEG measures and normal cognitive outcome, but these were no longer significant after adjustment for confounders. Socioeconomic status and neonatal morbidity were independent predictors of cognitive outcome.

CONCLUSION

Early short-term aEEG did not predict later cognitive outcome in our cohort of very preterm infants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Abstract

AIM

We investigated the association between early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) and cognitive outcome in very preterm infants at early school-age.

METHODS

This prospective cohort study, conducted in the Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland, from 2009-2012, comprised infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestation, who underwent continuous aEEG recording during the first four days of life. Cognitive outcome was assessed with the Kaufman-Assessment Battery for Children at five years. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were calculated between aEEG parameters and normal cognitive outcome, defined as an intelligence quotient (IQ) of at least 85.

RESULTS

The 118 (52.5% male) infants were born at a mean gestational age of 29.9 weeks and a mean birth weight of 1,235 ±363 grams. We followed up 89 children at the age of five and they had a mean IQ of 97.8 ±12.7 with 21.3% under 85 - and 2.2% had cerebral palsy. Univariate analyses found associations between aEEG measures and normal cognitive outcome, but these were no longer significant after adjustment for confounders. Socioeconomic status and neonatal morbidity were independent predictors of cognitive outcome.

CONCLUSION

Early short-term aEEG did not predict later cognitive outcome in our cohort of very preterm infants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 January 2020
Deposited On:25 Jul 2019 08:26
Last Modified:27 Feb 2020 08:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0803-5253
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/apa.14919
Official URL:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/apa.14919
PubMed ID:31254357

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