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The longitudinal effect of social recognition on PTSD symptomatology and vice versa: Evidence from a population-based study


van der Velden, Peter G; Oudejans, Marije; Das, Marcel; Bosmans, Mark W G; Maercker, Andreas (2019). The longitudinal effect of social recognition on PTSD symptomatology and vice versa: Evidence from a population-based study. Psychiatry Research, 279:287-294.

Abstract

A specific type of social support after potentially traumatic events is called "social recognition". It is the acknowledgement or validation of event-related thoughts, behavior, and feelings by the individual or others. It consists of positive individual or societal reactions that recognize and acknowledge victims' traumatic experiences and difficulties. Current studies suggest that social recognition protects against the development of PTSD symptomatology, but there is a lack of population-based studies assessing the longitudinal interplay between PTSD symptomatology and social recognition. For this purpose, we conducted a longitudinal study using the Dutch LISS panel, based on a random sample of the Dutch population. Structural equation modeling showed that among recently affected adults (0-2 months ago), those with relatively higher levels of social recognition had lower levels of PTSD symptomatology 6 months later. Victims with high levels of PTSD symptomatology at baseline received less social recognition 6 months later. On the intermediate term (affected 5-12 months ago), baseline social recognition was no longer predictive of PTSD symptoms 6 months later, in contrast to PTSD symptomatology predicting lack of social recognition. In sum, PTSD symptom levels eroded social recognition on the short and intermediate term, while the protective role of social recognition was limited to the short term.

Abstract

A specific type of social support after potentially traumatic events is called "social recognition". It is the acknowledgement or validation of event-related thoughts, behavior, and feelings by the individual or others. It consists of positive individual or societal reactions that recognize and acknowledge victims' traumatic experiences and difficulties. Current studies suggest that social recognition protects against the development of PTSD symptomatology, but there is a lack of population-based studies assessing the longitudinal interplay between PTSD symptomatology and social recognition. For this purpose, we conducted a longitudinal study using the Dutch LISS panel, based on a random sample of the Dutch population. Structural equation modeling showed that among recently affected adults (0-2 months ago), those with relatively higher levels of social recognition had lower levels of PTSD symptomatology 6 months later. Victims with high levels of PTSD symptomatology at baseline received less social recognition 6 months later. On the intermediate term (affected 5-12 months ago), baseline social recognition was no longer predictive of PTSD symptoms 6 months later, in contrast to PTSD symptomatology predicting lack of social recognition. In sum, PTSD symptom levels eroded social recognition on the short and intermediate term, while the protective role of social recognition was limited to the short term.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Life Sciences > Biological Psychiatry
Language:English
Date:1 September 2019
Deposited On:11 Jul 2019 09:07
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 11:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-1781
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.05.044
PubMed ID:31262536

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