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Identification of a miniature Sae2/Ctp1/CtIP ortholog from Paramecium tetraurelia required for sexual reproduction and DNA double-strand break repair


Godau, Julia; Ferretti, Lorenza P; Trenner, Anika; Dubois, Emeline; von Aesch, Christine; Marmignon, Antoine; Simon, Lauriane; Kapusta, Aurélie; Guérois, Raphaël; Bétermier, Mireille; Sartori, Alessandro A (2019). Identification of a miniature Sae2/Ctp1/CtIP ortholog from Paramecium tetraurelia required for sexual reproduction and DNA double-strand break repair. DNA repair, 77:96-108.

Abstract

DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by genotoxic agents can cause cell death or contribute to chromosomal instability, a major driving force of cancer. By contrast, Spo11-dependent DSBs formed during meiosis are aimed at generating genetic diversity. In eukaryotes, CtIP and the Mre11 nuclease complex are essential for accurate processing and repair of both unscheduled and programmed DSBs by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we applied bioinformatics and genetic analysis to identify Paramecium tetraurelia CtIP (PtCtIP), the smallest known Sae2/Ctp1/CtIP ortholog, as a key factor for the completion of meiosis and the recovery of viable sexual progeny. Using in vitro assays, we find that purified recombinant PtCtIP preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA substrates but does not contain intrinsic nuclease activity. Moreover, mutation of the evolutionarily conserved C-terminal 'RHR' motif abrogates DNA binding of PtCtIP but not its ability to functionally interact with Mre11. Translating our findings into mammalian cells, we provide evidence that disruption of the 'RHR' motif abrogates accumulation of human CtIP at sites of DSBs. Consequently, cells expressing the DNA binding mutant CtIP are defective in DSB resection and HR. Collectively, our work highlights minimal structural requirements for CtIP protein family members to facilitate the processing of DSBs, thereby maintaining genome stability as well as enabling sexual reproduction.

Abstract

DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by genotoxic agents can cause cell death or contribute to chromosomal instability, a major driving force of cancer. By contrast, Spo11-dependent DSBs formed during meiosis are aimed at generating genetic diversity. In eukaryotes, CtIP and the Mre11 nuclease complex are essential for accurate processing and repair of both unscheduled and programmed DSBs by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we applied bioinformatics and genetic analysis to identify Paramecium tetraurelia CtIP (PtCtIP), the smallest known Sae2/Ctp1/CtIP ortholog, as a key factor for the completion of meiosis and the recovery of viable sexual progeny. Using in vitro assays, we find that purified recombinant PtCtIP preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA substrates but does not contain intrinsic nuclease activity. Moreover, mutation of the evolutionarily conserved C-terminal 'RHR' motif abrogates DNA binding of PtCtIP but not its ability to functionally interact with Mre11. Translating our findings into mammalian cells, we provide evidence that disruption of the 'RHR' motif abrogates accumulation of human CtIP at sites of DSBs. Consequently, cells expressing the DNA binding mutant CtIP are defective in DSB resection and HR. Collectively, our work highlights minimal structural requirements for CtIP protein family members to facilitate the processing of DSBs, thereby maintaining genome stability as well as enabling sexual reproduction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2019
Deposited On:31 Jul 2019 12:35
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:39
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1568-7856
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dnarep.2019.03.011
PubMed ID:30928893

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