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The meaning of my feelings depends on who I am: Work-related identifications shape emotion effects in organizations


Conroy, Samantha A; Becker, William J; Menges, Jochen I (2017). The meaning of my feelings depends on who I am: Work-related identifications shape emotion effects in organizations. Academy of Management Journal, 60(3):1071-1093.

Abstract

Theory and research on affect in organizations has mostly approached emotions from a valence perspective, suggesting that positive emotions lead to positive outcomes and negative emotions to negative outcomes for organizations. We propose that cognition resulting from emotional experiences at work cannot be assumed based on emotion valence alone. Instead, building on appraisal theory and social identity theory, we propose that individual responses to discrete emotions in organizations are shaped by, and thus depend on, work-related identifications. We elaborate on this proposition specifically with respect to turnover intentions, theorizing how three discrete emotions—anger, guilt, and pride—differentially affect turnover intentions, depending on two work-related identifications: organizational and occupational. A longitudinal study involving 135 pilot instructors reporting emotions, work-related identifications, and turnover intentions over the course of one year provides general support for our proposition. Our theory and findings advance emotion and identity theories by explaining how the effects of emotions are dependent on the psychological context in which they are experienced.

Abstract

Theory and research on affect in organizations has mostly approached emotions from a valence perspective, suggesting that positive emotions lead to positive outcomes and negative emotions to negative outcomes for organizations. We propose that cognition resulting from emotional experiences at work cannot be assumed based on emotion valence alone. Instead, building on appraisal theory and social identity theory, we propose that individual responses to discrete emotions in organizations are shaped by, and thus depend on, work-related identifications. We elaborate on this proposition specifically with respect to turnover intentions, theorizing how three discrete emotions—anger, guilt, and pride—differentially affect turnover intentions, depending on two work-related identifications: organizational and occupational. A longitudinal study involving 135 pilot instructors reporting emotions, work-related identifications, and turnover intentions over the course of one year provides general support for our proposition. Our theory and findings advance emotion and identity theories by explaining how the effects of emotions are dependent on the psychological context in which they are experienced.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Business and International Management
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Business, Management and Accounting
Social Sciences & Humanities > Strategy and Management
Social Sciences & Humanities > Management of Technology and Innovation
Language:English
Date:1 June 2017
Deposited On:08 Aug 2019 14:16
Last Modified:28 Jul 2020 14:11
Publisher:Academy of Management
ISSN:0001-4273
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2014.1040
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:17510

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