Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Schultz’s rule in domesticated mammals


Geiger, Madeleine; Asher, Robert J (2019). Schultz’s rule in domesticated mammals. Mammalian Biology - Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde, 98:36-42.

Abstract

Schultz’s rule predicts early eruption of replacement teeth (incisors, canines, and premolars) relative to molars as growth slows and life history events take place over a greater span of time. Here, we investigate if the opposite trend might occur during the domestication process as a consequence of an accelerated life-history and driven by increased energetic needs. We provide new data on tooth eruption in four mammalian species and their domesticated forms: wolf and dog, polecat and ferret, bezoar and goat, wild boar and pig. Our results show some variation in eruption sequences between wild and domestic forms, but none that is consistent and reliably distinct from intraspecific variation. There may be variation in the absolute timing of dental eruption, but despite well documented changes across life history variables, which distinguish wild from domestic forms, eruption sequences remained constant in each wild and domestic version of the species we examined. A conserved eruption sequence is in accordance with many earlier studies, which found no evidence for Schultz’s rule in some wild clades of mammals. Phylogenetic conservation and functional factors likely play an important role in constraining patterns of growth and tooth eruption in these mammals. Furthermore, we suggest that the domestication processes started too recently for fundamental changes of tooth eruption sequences to occur.

Abstract

Schultz’s rule predicts early eruption of replacement teeth (incisors, canines, and premolars) relative to molars as growth slows and life history events take place over a greater span of time. Here, we investigate if the opposite trend might occur during the domestication process as a consequence of an accelerated life-history and driven by increased energetic needs. We provide new data on tooth eruption in four mammalian species and their domesticated forms: wolf and dog, polecat and ferret, bezoar and goat, wild boar and pig. Our results show some variation in eruption sequences between wild and domestic forms, but none that is consistent and reliably distinct from intraspecific variation. There may be variation in the absolute timing of dental eruption, but despite well documented changes across life history variables, which distinguish wild from domestic forms, eruption sequences remained constant in each wild and domestic version of the species we examined. A conserved eruption sequence is in accordance with many earlier studies, which found no evidence for Schultz’s rule in some wild clades of mammals. Phylogenetic conservation and functional factors likely play an important role in constraining patterns of growth and tooth eruption in these mammals. Furthermore, we suggest that the domestication processes started too recently for fundamental changes of tooth eruption sequences to occur.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 09 Aug 2019
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Uncontrolled Keywords:Animal Science and Zoology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:1 September 2019
Deposited On:09 Aug 2019 07:46
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:39
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1616-5047
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mambio.2019.07.002

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members