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A Systematic Phylogenetic Approach to Study the Interaction of HIV-1 With Coinfections, Noncommunicable Diseases, and Opportunistic Diseases.


Kusejko, Katharina; Bachmann, Nadine; Chaudron, Sandra E; Nguyen, Huyen; Braun, Dominique L; Hampel, Benjamin; Battegay, Manuel; Bernasconi, Enos; Calmy, Alexandra; Cavassini, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Perreau, Matthieu; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kouyos, Roger D; Swiss HIV Cohort Study (2019). A Systematic Phylogenetic Approach to Study the Interaction of HIV-1 With Coinfections, Noncommunicable Diseases, and Opportunistic Diseases. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 220(2):244-253.

Abstract

To systematically test whether coinfections spread along the HIV-1 transmission network and whether similarities in HIV-1 genomes predict AIDS-defining illnesses and comorbidities, we analyzed the distribution of these variables on the HIV phylogeny of the densely sampled Swiss HIV Cohort Study. By combining different statistical methods, we could detect, quantify, and explain the clustering of diseases. Infectious conditions such as hepatitis C, but also Kaposi sarcoma, clustered significantly, suggesting transmission of these infections along the HIV-1 transmission network. The clustering of patients with neurocognitive complaints could not be completely explained by the clustering of patients with similar demographic risk factors, which suggests a potential impact of viral genetics. In summary, the consistent and robust signal for coinfections and comorbidities highlights the strong interaction of HIV-1 and other infections and shows the potential of combining phylogenetic methods to identify disease traits that are likely to be related to virus genetic factors.

Abstract

To systematically test whether coinfections spread along the HIV-1 transmission network and whether similarities in HIV-1 genomes predict AIDS-defining illnesses and comorbidities, we analyzed the distribution of these variables on the HIV phylogeny of the densely sampled Swiss HIV Cohort Study. By combining different statistical methods, we could detect, quantify, and explain the clustering of diseases. Infectious conditions such as hepatitis C, but also Kaposi sarcoma, clustered significantly, suggesting transmission of these infections along the HIV-1 transmission network. The clustering of patients with neurocognitive complaints could not be completely explained by the clustering of patients with similar demographic risk factors, which suggests a potential impact of viral genetics. In summary, the consistent and robust signal for coinfections and comorbidities highlights the strong interaction of HIV-1 and other infections and shows the potential of combining phylogenetic methods to identify disease traits that are likely to be related to virus genetic factors.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:19 June 2019
Deposited On:08 Aug 2019 14:36
Last Modified:31 Oct 2019 08:22
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0022-1899
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz093
PubMed ID:30835292

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