Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The cost-effectiveness of inputs in primary education: insights from the literature and recent student surveys for Sub-Saharan Africa


Michaelowa, Katharina; Wechtler, Annika (2006). The cost-effectiveness of inputs in primary education: insights from the literature and recent student surveys for Sub-Saharan Africa. Paris: Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA).

Abstract

1. The 2003 ADEA biennial meeting on the Challenge of Learning already collected considerable evidence for a set of cost-effective “high priority” inputs for primary education systems in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study, this evidence is complemented with empirical results from recent studies based on promising new methodological approaches, such as random evaluations and natural experiments. Moreover, micro data from large-scale student assessments which has recently become available for both anglophone and francophone Africa, is explored to check the robustness of results in the African context. Generally, the outcomes are in line with earlier policy recommendations.
2. In addition, immaterial school inputs such as accountability, effort and motivation are taken into account. Preliminary evidence suggests that in sub-Saharan Africa, institutional reform should focus on the optimization of contract teacher programs, on raising transparency about resource flows and learning outcomes, and on other measures to enhance parents’ monitoring capacity.
3. Generally, it seems that educational policy reform should be a mix of an introduction of incentive based mechanisms for teachers and principals (carefully adjusted to the local context), and the provision of basic school inputs, especially learning materials such as textbooks.

Abstract

1. The 2003 ADEA biennial meeting on the Challenge of Learning already collected considerable evidence for a set of cost-effective “high priority” inputs for primary education systems in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study, this evidence is complemented with empirical results from recent studies based on promising new methodological approaches, such as random evaluations and natural experiments. Moreover, micro data from large-scale student assessments which has recently become available for both anglophone and francophone Africa, is explored to check the robustness of results in the African context. Generally, the outcomes are in line with earlier policy recommendations.
2. In addition, immaterial school inputs such as accountability, effort and motivation are taken into account. Preliminary evidence suggests that in sub-Saharan Africa, institutional reform should focus on the optimization of contract teacher programs, on raising transparency about resource flows and learning outcomes, and on other measures to enhance parents’ monitoring capacity.
3. Generally, it seems that educational policy reform should be a mix of an introduction of incentive based mechanisms for teachers and principals (carefully adjusted to the local context), and the provision of basic school inputs, especially learning materials such as textbooks.

Statistics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 25 Jul 2019
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Published Research Report
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:25 Jul 2019 14:22
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:40
Publisher:Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA)
Series Name:ADEA Working Document
Number of Pages:57
OA Status:Closed
Official URL:http://www.adeanet.org/adea/biennial-2006/doc/document/B1_2_michaelova_en.pdf
Related URLs:http://www.adeanet.org/en/adea-publications (Organisation)

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members