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Dépenses d'éducation, qualité de l'éducation et pauvreté: l’exemple de cinq pays d’Afrique francophone


Michaelowa, Katharina (2000). Dépenses d'éducation, qualité de l'éducation et pauvreté: l’exemple de cinq pays d’Afrique francophone. Document de travail 157, OECD Development Centre.

Abstract

What are the most efficient means to ensure basic learning competencies for a high number of children? This question is analysed on the basis of the exceptionally rich data set provided by the Programme d’analyse des systèmes éducatifs des pays de la CONFEMEN (PASEC), standardised and comparable for Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Madagascar and Senegal. Within the analysis of the determinants of education quality, particular attention is paid to the situation of different social groups (poor/non-poor, boys/girls). It turns out that poor children are disadvantaged with respect to their learning possibilities because they have a particularly high probability of the absence of certain factors, which are important for the learning of all children. These factors include the availability of books, the parents’ literacy, access to radio and television, the possibility of studying at home, and the availability of meals on a regular basis. As to the distinction between boys and girls, it seems that each group benefits from a teacher of the same sex. If it is intended to target the efforts of education policy on girls, more women will thus have to be encouraged to become teachers.
A further question dealt with is the possible trade off between enrolment (quantity) and the quality of education. No support for this hypothesis emerges from the econometric analysis. On the contrary, it seems that current numbers of students enrolled in a single class — though often quite high — still leaves room for more pupils without significant losses in their learning achievement. In the African countries analysed, one could therefore satisfy the demand for education by a higher number of children without fear of a marked reduction in learning quality.
In sum, it becomes clear that there are multiple options to enhance the efficiency of primary school spending. The level of spending with respect to GDP has a significant impact on the pupils’ learning achievements, but at least as important as the amount of resources available is the way these resources are used.

Abstract

What are the most efficient means to ensure basic learning competencies for a high number of children? This question is analysed on the basis of the exceptionally rich data set provided by the Programme d’analyse des systèmes éducatifs des pays de la CONFEMEN (PASEC), standardised and comparable for Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Madagascar and Senegal. Within the analysis of the determinants of education quality, particular attention is paid to the situation of different social groups (poor/non-poor, boys/girls). It turns out that poor children are disadvantaged with respect to their learning possibilities because they have a particularly high probability of the absence of certain factors, which are important for the learning of all children. These factors include the availability of books, the parents’ literacy, access to radio and television, the possibility of studying at home, and the availability of meals on a regular basis. As to the distinction between boys and girls, it seems that each group benefits from a teacher of the same sex. If it is intended to target the efforts of education policy on girls, more women will thus have to be encouraged to become teachers.
A further question dealt with is the possible trade off between enrolment (quantity) and the quality of education. No support for this hypothesis emerges from the econometric analysis. On the contrary, it seems that current numbers of students enrolled in a single class — though often quite high — still leaves room for more pupils without significant losses in their learning achievement. In the African countries analysed, one could therefore satisfy the demand for education by a higher number of children without fear of a marked reduction in learning quality.
In sum, it becomes clear that there are multiple options to enhance the efficiency of primary school spending. The level of spending with respect to GDP has a significant impact on the pupils’ learning achievements, but at least as important as the amount of resources available is the way these resources are used.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Educational expenditure, education quality and poverty: evidence for five francophone African countries
Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Language:English
Date:April 2000
Deposited On:29 Jul 2019 13:48
Last Modified:07 Apr 2020 07:21
Series Name:Document de travail
Number of Pages:62
ISSN:1815-1949
Additional Information:Früherer Serientitel: Documents techniques = Document technique
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1787/650713828042
Related URLs:https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/development/depenses-d-education-qualite-de-l-education-et-pauvrete_650713828042 (Publisher)

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