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Passion: Buzzword or theoretical construct?


Jachimowicz, Jon Michael; Menges, Jochen; Wrzesniewski, Amy (2016). Passion: Buzzword or theoretical construct? Academy of Management. Proceedings, 16(1):n/a.

Abstract

Why are employees motivated to work? If we believe graduation speakers, it is to "follow their passion" and to "do what they love." Being passionate about one's work is increasingly seen as an important component of employees' motivation, and has sparked recent calls for a theoretical construct of its' own (Perrewé et al. 2012). However, whether passion for work is really essential to work-related outcomes is unclear. Employees can view their work in a variety of ways, as a job, career or a calling (Wrzesniewski et al., 1997), which may determine the importance of passion for work. Because multiple sources of motivation do not add to each other to create larger overall motivation (Wrzesniewski et al. 2014), we wonder is passion really necessary? In addition, a new set of studies questions whether passion is something that is fixed or can be grown (Chen et al., 2015), and whether passion can develop with invested energy over time (Gielnik et al., 2015). Is passion necessary for a meaningful life? Does passion have to occur at work? How can passion be refueled? In this symposium, we propose to start thinking about passion more rigorously, and help establish it as a meaningful construct in the organizational behavioral literature.

Abstract

Why are employees motivated to work? If we believe graduation speakers, it is to "follow their passion" and to "do what they love." Being passionate about one's work is increasingly seen as an important component of employees' motivation, and has sparked recent calls for a theoretical construct of its' own (Perrewé et al. 2012). However, whether passion for work is really essential to work-related outcomes is unclear. Employees can view their work in a variety of ways, as a job, career or a calling (Wrzesniewski et al., 1997), which may determine the importance of passion for work. Because multiple sources of motivation do not add to each other to create larger overall motivation (Wrzesniewski et al. 2014), we wonder is passion really necessary? In addition, a new set of studies questions whether passion is something that is fixed or can be grown (Chen et al., 2015), and whether passion can develop with invested energy over time (Gielnik et al., 2015). Is passion necessary for a meaningful life? Does passion have to occur at work? How can passion be refueled? In this symposium, we propose to start thinking about passion more rigorously, and help establish it as a meaningful construct in the organizational behavioral literature.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:9 August 2016
Deposited On:16 Aug 2019 14:09
Last Modified:24 Oct 2019 09:59
Publisher:Academy of Management
ISSN:2151-6561
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2016.10963symposium
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:17967

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