Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Different growth responses to temperature and resource limitation in three fly species with similar life histories


Blanckenhorn, Wolf U (1999). Different growth responses to temperature and resource limitation in three fly species with similar life histories. Evolutionary Ecology, 13(4):395-409.

Abstract

Growth responses to temperature and resource limitation in three dipteran species with similar life histories were compared. With respect to current life history theory, two points are raised. First, growth rate in real time increased steeply with temperature in all species, following the standard pattern. However, when expressed in physiological time growth rate increased as temperature decreased in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria, remained approximately constant in Sepsis cynipsea, and increased in Drosophila melanogaster. These responses can be understood as adaptations to climate and seasonality. It is concluded that some patterns of adaptation may be more easily interpreted if, and some may even go undetected unless, they are analysed in physiological time. Second, a decrease in body size, development rate and growth rate when resources are limited is believed to be nearly universal and generally predicted by life history models. Despite their similar life histories, the three species investigated showed qualitatively different growth responses to larval food shortage. At unlimited resources, yellow dung flies showed the fastest initial larval body mass gain per unit time, while those of S. cynipsea and D. melanogaster were lower and about equal. The period of no body mass gain at the end of larval development was longest in S. stercoraria and shortest in S. cynipsea. When facing resource limitation, S. stercoraria emerged smaller but earlier (thus nearly maintaining their growth rate), S. cynipsea smaller after the same development period, and D. melanogaster smaller and later (showing reduced and much reduced growth, respectively). It is concluded that whether growth really slows when resources are limited depends on the precise ecological circumstances of the species in question. More refined models, particularly those where mortality costs are independent of time, and more experiments are necessary to account for the variation in growth and size and age at maturity present in nature.

Abstract

Growth responses to temperature and resource limitation in three dipteran species with similar life histories were compared. With respect to current life history theory, two points are raised. First, growth rate in real time increased steeply with temperature in all species, following the standard pattern. However, when expressed in physiological time growth rate increased as temperature decreased in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria, remained approximately constant in Sepsis cynipsea, and increased in Drosophila melanogaster. These responses can be understood as adaptations to climate and seasonality. It is concluded that some patterns of adaptation may be more easily interpreted if, and some may even go undetected unless, they are analysed in physiological time. Second, a decrease in body size, development rate and growth rate when resources are limited is believed to be nearly universal and generally predicted by life history models. Despite their similar life histories, the three species investigated showed qualitatively different growth responses to larval food shortage. At unlimited resources, yellow dung flies showed the fastest initial larval body mass gain per unit time, while those of S. cynipsea and D. melanogaster were lower and about equal. The period of no body mass gain at the end of larval development was longest in S. stercoraria and shortest in S. cynipsea. When facing resource limitation, S. stercoraria emerged smaller but earlier (thus nearly maintaining their growth rate), S. cynipsea smaller after the same development period, and D. melanogaster smaller and later (showing reduced and much reduced growth, respectively). It is concluded that whether growth really slows when resources are limited depends on the precise ecological circumstances of the species in question. More refined models, particularly those where mortality costs are independent of time, and more experiments are necessary to account for the variation in growth and size and age at maturity present in nature.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
86 citations in Web of Science®
87 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 22 Aug 2019
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:1 May 1999
Deposited On:22 Aug 2019 12:33
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 03:32
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0269-7653
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1006741222586

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members