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Anatomy and evolution of the first Coleoidea in the Carboniferous


Klug, Christian; Landman, Neil H; Fuchs, Dirk; Mapes, Royal H; Pohle, Alexander; Guériau, Pierre; Reguer, Solenn; Hoffmann, René (2019). Anatomy and evolution of the first Coleoidea in the Carboniferous. Communications Biology, 2(1):280.

Abstract

Coleoidea (squids and octopuses) comprise all crown group cephalopods except the Nautilida.
Coleoids are characterized by internal shell (endocochleate), ink sac and arm hooks, while nautilids lack an ink sac, arm hooks, suckers, and have an external conch (ectocochleate). Differentiating between straight conical conchs (orthocones) of Palaeozoic Coleoidea and other ectocochleates is only possible when rostrum (shell covering the
chambered phragmocone) and body chamber are preserved. Here, we provide information on how this internalization might have evolved. We re-examined one of the oldest coleoids, Gordoniconus beargulchensis from the Early Carboniferous of the Bear Gulch Fossil-Lagerstätte (Montana) by synchrotron, various lights and Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI). This revealed previously unappreciated anatomical details, on which we base evolutionary scenarios of how the internalization and other evolutionary steps in early coleoid evolution
proceeded. We suggest that conch internalization happened rather suddenly including early growth stages while the ink sac evolved slightly later.

Abstract

Coleoidea (squids and octopuses) comprise all crown group cephalopods except the Nautilida.
Coleoids are characterized by internal shell (endocochleate), ink sac and arm hooks, while nautilids lack an ink sac, arm hooks, suckers, and have an external conch (ectocochleate). Differentiating between straight conical conchs (orthocones) of Palaeozoic Coleoidea and other ectocochleates is only possible when rostrum (shell covering the
chambered phragmocone) and body chamber are preserved. Here, we provide information on how this internalization might have evolved. We re-examined one of the oldest coleoids, Gordoniconus beargulchensis from the Early Carboniferous of the Bear Gulch Fossil-Lagerstätte (Montana) by synchrotron, various lights and Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI). This revealed previously unappreciated anatomical details, on which we base evolutionary scenarios of how the internalization and other evolutionary steps in early coleoid evolution
proceeded. We suggest that conch internalization happened rather suddenly including early growth stages while the ink sac evolved slightly later.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > General Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Health Sciences > Medicine (miscellaneous)
Language:English
Date:1 December 2019
Deposited On:16 Aug 2019 07:58
Last Modified:12 Sep 2020 11:48
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2399-3642
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-019-0523-2
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID200021_169627
  • : Project TitleEvolution and Palaeobiology of early cephalopods (Nautiloidea)

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