Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Using age grading by wing injuries to estimate size-dependent adult survivorship in the field: a case study of the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria


Burkhard, Dieter U; Ward, Paul I; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U (2002). Using age grading by wing injuries to estimate size-dependent adult survivorship in the field: a case study of the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria. Ecological Entomology, 27(5):514-520.

Abstract

1. Studies of natural selection depend on estimates of longevity and mortality in the wild. In small and mobile species such as insects, direct, mark–recapture (resight), studies are difficult to perform because individuals cannot be tracked easily.
2. It was investigated whether age grading based on wing injuries alone can be used to estimate size‐specific survivorship in the field in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria (L.) (Diptera: Scathophagidae).
3. The accumulation of different types of wing injury throughout the spring and autumn flight seasons for both sexes was recorded: tears, notches (both reflecting regular wear), and large missing areas (probably due to intra‐ and inter‐specific interactions).
4. Female longevity increased with body size in both spring and autumn, whereas male longevity increased slightly with size in spring but decreased in autumn.
5. The two sexes and males of different size classes accumulated the various types of wing injury differentially, presumably due to differential patterns of intraspecific interactions. Additionally, body size exhibited a seasonal pattern, complicating interpretation of the relationship between body size and wing injuries.
6. It is therefore concluded that estimating adult viability selection on body size using wing injuries is problematic in dung flies, and potentially also in other species. It is suggested that before this method is applied in any particular species, pilot studies should be conducted to verify whether wing injuries accumulate equally in all classes of individuals of interest. In addition, it is necessary to investigate the causes of different types of wing injury.

Abstract

1. Studies of natural selection depend on estimates of longevity and mortality in the wild. In small and mobile species such as insects, direct, mark–recapture (resight), studies are difficult to perform because individuals cannot be tracked easily.
2. It was investigated whether age grading based on wing injuries alone can be used to estimate size‐specific survivorship in the field in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria (L.) (Diptera: Scathophagidae).
3. The accumulation of different types of wing injury throughout the spring and autumn flight seasons for both sexes was recorded: tears, notches (both reflecting regular wear), and large missing areas (probably due to intra‐ and inter‐specific interactions).
4. Female longevity increased with body size in both spring and autumn, whereas male longevity increased slightly with size in spring but decreased in autumn.
5. The two sexes and males of different size classes accumulated the various types of wing injury differentially, presumably due to differential patterns of intraspecific interactions. Additionally, body size exhibited a seasonal pattern, complicating interpretation of the relationship between body size and wing injuries.
6. It is therefore concluded that estimating adult viability selection on body size using wing injuries is problematic in dung flies, and potentially also in other species. It is suggested that before this method is applied in any particular species, pilot studies should be conducted to verify whether wing injuries accumulate equally in all classes of individuals of interest. In addition, it is necessary to investigate the causes of different types of wing injury.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
27 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 22 Aug 2019
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Ecology
Life Sciences > Insect Science
Language:English
Date:1 October 2002
Deposited On:22 Aug 2019 12:18
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 03:33
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0307-6946
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2311.2002.00453.x

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members